attend: be consequent

rightnow

Senior Member
Spanish
The definition reads as follows, but I cannot make up an example, as I'd expect the prepostition from which the verb follow takes with this meaning

Attend: to be consequent (usually fol. by on or upon)
 
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  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think maybe you misunderstand the definition.

    To be consequent upon (or on) something means to follow it, usually in the sense of being a consequence of it.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Aah. Sorry, I missed that.

    To be attendant upon means virtually the same as to be consequent upon.

    I don’t think that meaning is ever expressed by the verb “attend”. If it is, it’s very rare and probably archaic.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The fact remains that that’s not a common use of the verb “attend”.

    One of those definitions has the example: The events that attended on the assassination were mysterious. This is very unusual, and untypical of modern English.
     

    rightnow

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    According to Microsoft® Encarta® 2009
    transitive verb: to accompany something or be associated with it (formal) (usually passive)
    intransitive verb: to be the consequence of something (literary)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, I know. Various meanings exist. But by far the most common modern uses of attend are to be present at (e.g. a meeting/function or a religious service) or to go to/take part in on a regular basis (e.g. a school or a class/course of study), or in the form “attend to” somebody or something. A less common usage is in the sense of accompany.
     
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