attribute or object complement?

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viola084

Member
Chinese
Do you have anything planned for Saturday and Sunday?

What is the function of "planned for Saturday and Sunday" ? An attribute or an object complement?
Thanks in advance!
 
  • Forero

    Senior Member
    Of the two choices, I would call it an object complement. The sentence does not mean "Do you have anything which is planned ...?" but "Have you planned anything ...?". "Planned ..." is not part of the direct object.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I think it's a modifier (attribute) inside the noun phrase headed by 'anything'. The evidence is that the whole noun phrase can be moved around into a variety of positions:

    Subject: Anything planned for Saturday will have to be cancelled.
    Preposed object of verb: Anything planned for Saturday you'll have to cancel.
    Object of preposition: This won't clash with anything planned for Saturday.
    Predicative complement: The main concern now is anything planned for Saturday.

    On the other hand, if it was a complement in the verb phrase, you should be able to separate it from the noun phrase 'anything'. But all I can think of is adverbs and the like, and 'anything already/coincidentally planned' can still function as a noun phrase and be moved around as a unit, as above, so those don't prove anything.
     

    viola084

    Member
    Chinese
    Cagey, do you mean it is a OC?
    The first one is of a great help to me.But I still can't decide it.However,we always tell our students that "have sth done" has a meaning like this---things done by others or sth happened to sb.
    Such as
    I had my hair cut./ I had my wallet stolen./I had my right leg broken in the accident.
    In this sentence, the plan should be made by the subject of the sentence, so planned can't be an object complement. Is this right?
     
    Last edited:

    viola084

    Member
    Chinese
    Entanglebank
    Thanks for you detailed explanation.It seems a little bit clear to me.But I have to say I thought "Planned for Saturday on Sunday" could be an past participle phrases used as an object complement to express the passive voice between "plan"and " anything" when I posted this thread. And what I said to Gagey and what you said to me are the reason I changed my mind.But I still wonder whether what I said to Gagey is right.
    Anyway, thanks a lot for your kind help.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The passive construction in 'I had my wallet stolen' is obviously irrelevant: no-one planned anything for Saturday against my will or without my knowledge. The causative 'I had the house painted' is closer: it means I got someone else to paint the house for me. But this is still unlikely here: I probably didn't get someone to plan something for Saturday for me. (My secretary, perhaps?) Probably I planned it myself. Another way of saying it is: I planned something for Saturday.

    Then, after I had done that, we can say that I had something planned for Saturday. This 'had' is not causative, but possessive: it says what I had.

    I have to admit I'm still not 100% convinced my earlier analysis is right. It does feel as if the 'planned' phrase could be a separate complement in the verb phrase. But I think I'm probably right, unless someone can produce better evidence that the two parts can be separated.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    At first sight it might mean either

    1. Have you planned anything for Saturday etc.?

    or

    2. Have you anything which is planned for Saturday etc...?

    Of course, in 2., it will be you who have planned it, so the meaning evolves into Have you anything which you have planned for Saturday etc...?, and this is becoming logically knotty - obviously if you have it planned, you have something, so why is the person asking? etc., so I'm with Forero, and, looking back at his post, I see we have argued the case in very similar ways.
     

    viola084

    Member
    Chinese
    The passive construction in 'I had my wallet stolen' is obviously irrelevant: no-one planned anything for Saturday against my will or without my knowledge. The causative 'I had the house painted' is closer: it means I got someone else to paint the house for me. But this is still unlikely here: I probably didn't get someone to plan something for Saturday for me. (My secretary, perhaps?) Probably I planned it myself. Another way of saying it is: I planned something for Saturday.

    Then, after I had done that, we can say that I had something planned for Saturday. This 'had' is not causative, but possessive: it says what I had.

    I have to admit I'm still not 100% convinced my earlier analysis is right. It does feel as if the 'planned' phrase could be a separate complement in the verb phrase. But I think I'm probably right, unless someone can produce better evidence that the two parts can be separated.
    ========================================================

    Thanks again." But this is still unlikely here: I probably didn't get someone to plan something for Saturday for me. (My secretary, perhaps?) Probably I planned it myself. Another way of saying it is: I planned something for Saturday." This is the point .
     
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