attributive clause or appositive clause

dolcedell

Senior Member
Italian
Hello,

The sentence below is from an article that I read online"

"Usually when someone who is labeled "clingy" it is pretty early in the relationship. And usually they are trying to turn a new relationship into something that it has not yet had the time to grow into."

My question is, is it grammatically correct to use "it" in the sentence? I think "that" starts an attributive clause, then it would be incorrect to use "it". But I just can't make sure if this sentence can be seen as an appositive clause?

Thanks a lot.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The word something is (or is the antecedent of) the object of into. If you turn the relative clause into an independent sentence it reads: It has not yet had the time to grow into something. The it refers to the new relationship. It is perhaps growing into something else.

    Now when you turn this into a relative clause, attached to something in an earlier clause, you get this: turn a new relationship into something that it has not yet had the time to grow into __. The gap at the end is where something belongs; the relativized element is this complement down here at the far end. The subject it is unaffected by the process of making a relative clause.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    "Usually when someone who is labeled "clingy" it is pretty early in the relationship. And usually they are trying to turn a new relationship into something into which it has not yet had the time to grow ."

    Is the above correct grammatically and easy to undersand?
     

    bare footed bear

    Member
    Chinese
    entangledbank is correct.

    But i am curious to know whether the sentence structure of "Usually when someone who is labeled "clingy" it is pretty early in the relationship" is correct or not?
     
    Last edited:

    twinkletoes56

    Member
    English USA
    bare footed bear, you're right. The relative clause is incomplete. Let me try re-phrasing the idea: It's usually pretty early in the relationship when someone is labeled "clingy." And while I'm at it, let me attempt the second part: And usually that someone is trying to turn a new relationship into something it hasn't had time to grow into. I don't think the "yet" is necessary, though you could put it in, of course.

    If you wanted to keep the relative clause, that might look like this: Usually when someone who is labeled "clingy" is in a relationship, it is pretty early in the relationship.
     
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