Au feeling

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TRIBEN

Member
French
This is a perfect frenglish expression we use in every day life.

Example:
Quand je fais le trajet de Brooklyn à Manhattan, je n'ai pas un itineraire précis, je le fais au feeling.

It means you do something following your feeling, without strong ground or solid data but you just do it this way because you feel like it.

I don't know how to put that in english...

Any ideas?

Moderator note: multiple threads merged to create this one
 
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  • bh7

    Senior Member
    Canada; English
    "to do sth. by ear, by the seat of one's pants" are two possible English equivalents

    others may be: haphazardly; at random; to walk nowhere in particular
    as one desires; as one sees fit; ad libitum
     
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    TRIBEN

    Member
    French
    "Randomly" could work?

    Like:
    "I commute from Brooklyn to Manhattan randomly, it all depends of how things happened".

    It sounds good, I don't know if it is good though.
     

    Jmus

    Member
    English
    I would say, 'I don't have a set itinerary, I just go with the flow.' or 'I just go whichever way suits my mood.'
     

    Mauricet

    Senior Member
    French - France
    "to do sth. by ear, by the seat of one's pants" are two possible English equivalents

    others may be: haphazardly; at random; to walk nowhere in particular
    as one desires; as one sees fit; ad libitum
    "Au feeling" n'est pas du tout "au hasard", mais plutôt en suivant son intuition et les impulsions du moment. Dans le cas d'un trajet en voiture à travers les encombrements, par exemple, ça peut inclure le flair du conducteur expert qui devine où la circulation sera la plus fluide ce jour-là.
     

    Santana2002

    Senior Member
    English, from Ireland
    Quand je fais le trajet de Brooklyn à Manhattan, je n'ai pas un itineraire précis, je le fais au feeling.

    Suggestion: When I travel from Brooklyn to Manhattan, I don't have a fixed route, I take whichever route I feel like at the time.
     

    ilfautque

    Member
    english
    to "wing it" might also be appropriate. One does not do something with a set plan, so they "wing it". This assumes that the person "winging it" knows enough about the subject to get by, but not enough to be precise.

    "Intuitively", "by instinct" and "to play something by ear" suggests that you know what you are doing or where you are going but that you can't reproduce an exact detailed description.

    "On a whim" suggests that you have multiple options but choose which one "au hasard".
     

    zazouTrn

    New Member
    français
    Note des modérateurs: nous avons ajouté cette question à une discussion précédente.

    Bonjour,

    Je n'arrive pas à trouver la traduction "au feeling", j'ai vu l'expression by feel, mais je ne trouve pas de texte originaux avec ce terme.
    Ma phrase exacte est : Du coup je n'ai rien préparé, ça a vraiment été au feeling !
    Le contexte est un Dj qui parle d'un dj set ...


    Merci d'avance !

     
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    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    The WR dictionary gives: feeling [filiŋ] nm (familier)(=intuition) feel, instinct
    au feeling by feel, by instinct

    Perhaps "off-the-cuff", "ad lib" or "spontaneous" would fit.
     

    OLN

    Senior Member
    French - France, ♀
    Par "ç'a été au feeling", veux-tu dire que le DJ a "senti" son auditoire et s'est adapté instinctivement à ses désirs ?

    Puisqu'il n'avait rien préparé, peut-être I had to improvise and to play by instinct.
     

    akaAJ

    Senior Member
    American English, Yiddish
    I assume "au feeling" is the same as "au pif". Another possibility is "I had to wing it". All three versions imply that he relied on his experience to improvise a program.
     

    OLN

    Senior Member
    French - France, ♀
    I assume "au feeling" is the same as "au pif". Another possibility is "I had to wing it". All three versions imply that he relied on his experience to improvise a program.
    Ou au flair, pour continuer à parler français (d'ailleurs, quel est cet anglicisme 'un dj set" ?). Mais attention, "au pif" signifie aussi "au hasard" dans le langage courant.

    Il suffisait de chercher dans l'historique pour voir qu'au pif, au pifomètre et au feeling ont a déjà fait l'objet de discussions dans ce forum.:)
     

    akaAJ

    Senior Member
    American English, Yiddish
    The disc jockey's work day is divided into "sets", where he works for X hours, then time off, then another set, until his engagement is completed. "un tour" ??
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    faire au feeling en français plutôt qu'en franglais pourrait donner : agir selon l'intuition du moment / suivre son intuition.
    Ou comme OLN a mentionné : y aller au flair.

    I had to wing it / I ad libed / I did it off-the-cuff = j'ai dû improviser / j'ai improvisé
    ... conviennent bien à mon avis pour traduire une phrase comme :
    Je n'avais rien préparé, alors j'ai dû mproviser. (I had no set plan so I had to wing it),

    Mais ce ne sont pas des équivalent de « faire au feeling » qui se traduit en général par play by instinct.

    Je crois que dj set = session de dj.

     
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    akaAJ

    Senior Member
    American English, Yiddish
    I get your point, OLN and Nicomon. but to anglophones, the suggested terms carry the sense of informed instinct (not really an oxymoron); "playing it by ear", e.g., includes modifying the activity on the fly, using experience to guess how best to adjust one's actions according to the reactions of the audience/target. In fact, Mauricet's entry on the link refers to an experienced driver sensing (intuiting, if you will, but by filtering his choice through his experience) the least encumbered route. Eating is an instinct; choosing a course of action, even if chosen without prior planning, is not.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    My point was that if I meant to say « J'ai dû improviser / J'ai improvisé » - which to me is what I had to wing it / I ad-libed / Played by ear mean - I wouldn't say « je l'ai fait au feeling / selon l'intuition du moment ».

    Mauricet used pretty much the same wording as I did, e.g. :
    en suivant son intuition et les impulsions du moment
    He also mentioned flair, that OLN suggested instead of au pif. What would be an English equivalent for those, other than "instinct" - which Keith Bradford approved of?

    Actually, what I think we're looking for is an English equivalent to : improviser au feeling / improviser en suivant son intuition.
     
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    akaAJ

    Senior Member
    American English, Yiddish
    My Larousse ties "flair" primarily to olfaction (flairer), but gives a second definition as the English "flair"; "a flair for X" is "a talent for X", sometimes (as with some uses of "talent") with an overtone of "innate" rather than "acquired". I feel I'm missing the nuance that the francophones are insisting on.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    @akaj: We used the French word flair in that sense - emphasis mine :
    Faculté de pressentir, perspicacité, clairvoyance, intuition. Flair de policier. Y aller au flair.
    Et j'aurais dû penser à followed my... après avoir suggéré suivre son intuition comme synonyme de faire au feeling. ;)
     
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    akaAJ

    Senior Member
    American English, Yiddish
    I thought "gut" had been introduced into the discussion, but I can't find the entry. It is true that "I followed my gut feeling(s)/gut instinct(s)/plain "gut" is current in American English, most frequently applied to sudden unexpected situations, as a metaphor for "not having time for detailed analysis, I relied on my accumulated experience and insights to suggest an appropriate action on the fly". We are not given the occasion on which the person acted "au feeling". "Du coup" doesn't imply surprise, but rather a an intervening event that precluded preparation (e.g., an unexpected task that ate up the allotted time) for a task which the speaker anticipated and presumably had experience in. I admit that a side issue (disk jockey set) distracted me into thinking that some well-known task was involved (I had a lecture to give on a subject in my field, but wound up not having time to prepare it). For such a situation "ad-lib" is appropriate and "instinctively" is way over the top. Still, if one recognizes that "gut feeling" and "au feeling" are somewhat extravagant metaphors for the (definitely non-instinctive, in the true meaning of the term) thought processes that I described here and in entries above. I accept that "followed my instincts" and "au feeling" are equivalent expressions I happen to find abusive.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    In a nutshell and as copied from two different dictionaries :
    Wikipédia :
    au feeling
    /o fi.liŋ/invariable
    1. (Familier) (Anglicisme) À l’intuition, au ressenti personnel.
    Antidote :
    au feeling

    Selon l’intuition du moment Il crée au feeling, sans plan établi.
    If you agree that ad-lib/wing it = improviser how would you translate a sentence such as this one ?
    Je n'en avais jamais fait, j'ai donc improvisé au feeling.
    There, I think that I played it by ear would work fine. But this is just the opinion of a non native. ;)
     
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    akaAJ

    Senior Member
    American English, Yiddish
    Sounds good to me. I guess my last diatribe was owing to the feeling that the French had hijacked the word "feeling" and twisted its meaning.
     
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