auf rauhe Offenheit ... eingestellt (from a text of 1969)

sedmont

Senior Member
English -- USA
I wonder if "adjusted" or "harmonized" or something else is the right translation for "eingestellt" below. Thank you for any help.

Es gab einen Versammlungsleiter mit klirrender Glocke, es gab Wortmeldungen, die nach der Liste erledigt wurden, es gab Geschäftsordnungsanträge, die alles unterbrachen, und das Ganze war nicht auf Zimperlichkeit, sondern auf rauhe Offenheit und kräftiges Hauen und Stechen eingestellt.

There was an assembly leader with a clanging bell, there were requests to speak, which were dealt with through a list, there were agenda proposals which interrupted everything, and the whole was not adjusted/harmonized squeamishly, but with raucous candor and forceful thrusts and jabs.’
 
  • Kajjo

    Senior Member
    ...und das Ganze war nicht auf Zimperlichkeit eingestellt...
    = and they didn't treat each other too gently
    = and they didn't treat each other with kid gloves


    Zimperlich does not mean squeamisch here but it's more like prissy, gentle, sensitive. They didn't care to treat each other politely, gently or formally correct. In contrast, they were raucous, disrespectful, coarse.

    The eingestellt is not idiomatic in contemporary German. It just gives properties of the style of communication. Don't think too much about this verb, simply describe the used adjectives.
     

    sedmont

    Senior Member
    English -- USA
    Thanks very much, anahiseri.

    Kajjo, does this work?

    There was an assembly leader with a clanging bell, there were requests to speak, which were dealt with through a list, there were agenda proposals which interrupted everything, and the whole was not carried on in a soft or prim fashion, but with raucous candor and forceful thrusts and jabs.

    Or do you prefer this?:

    ...which interrupted everything, and they did not treat each other in a soft or prim fashion, but with raucous candor and forceful thrusts and jabs.
     
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    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Both suggestions are possible. Personally I would have written "carried out", not "carried on", but it's your native language...

    However, I insist on something like "prissy" or "gentle" and not "prim". Prim is something quite different.
     

    Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Zumindest heutzutage würde man wohl eher „ausgerichtet“ statt „eingestellt“ sagen.
      1. auf etwas, jemanden einstellen, einrichten, abstellen
        Beispiel
        das Warenangebot auf die Bedürfnisse/nach den Bedürfnissen/an den Bedürfnissen der Käufer ausrichten
      2. in bestimmter Weise, an einer bestimmten Ideologie o. Ä. orientieren
        Beispiele
        • die Arbeit der Verbände einheitlich ausrichten
        • diese Gruppe ist kommunistisch ausgerichtet
    Duden | ausrichten | Rechtschreibung, Bedeutung, Definition, Synonyme
    Vielleicht passt "gear to(wards)" als Übersetzung?
    4. fig:
    ausrichten auf (+akk) oder nach adjust to;
    auf Ziel: aim at, direct at, gear to(wards); geistig: orient to(wards); (angleichen) bring into line with;
    kommunistisch etc ausgerichtet communist etc in orientation;
    ihr Verhalten war darauf ausgerichtet zu provozieren her behaviour was designed to provoke;
    das Programm auf den oder nach dem Geschmack des Publikums ausrichten tailor the program(me) to the audience’s taste
    ausrichten - Wörterbuch Deutsch-Englisch - WordReference.com
     

    sedmont

    Senior Member
    English -- USA
    Thank you Kajjo for the clear and helpful response. I will drop "prim" and use "gentle" or something along those lines.

    Schlabberlatz, thank you for showing me the connection between eingestellt and ausgerichtet, and the suggestion "geared to(wards)". Will think on that.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    ..and the whole was not done with (characterized by) delicacy, but rather tending towards raucous directness...
    There's a grammatical/syntactic issue here, since you can't coordinate the parts in pink this way.

    In the original, "eingestellt" refers to both parts, so you don't need two different formulations in English either. For example:

    ...none of which was done with...but with...
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    ...none of which was done with...but with...
    For syntactical analogy your suggestion is even better. With regards to the meaning, both versions are fine. Personally, I like bearded's version with two verbs, but you are right, this deviates from the original.
     
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    bearded

    Senior Member
    Elroy:
    You are right concerning the grammar issue. I'd prefer to differentiate the verbs, though, so I will amend my sentence as follows:
    ...and the whole was not done with delicacy, but rather tended towards raucous directness...
     
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    sedmont

    Senior Member
    English -- USA
    bearded, elroy, and Kajjo, thank you for the improved translation.

    Question: the sentence says "the whole was not done with delicacy -- but rather tended toward raucous directness..." Am I correct in understanding that the German implies that a small part of what happened was done with delicacy, while most of what went on was raucously direct? (Previously I was reading the sentence as saying that nothing was done with delicacy, everything with raucous directness.)
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Hi
    I understand that ''the whole'' was not done...but rather tended.... Das Ganze is the subject of it all. Das Ganze = everything/all that/the whole.
    I've just used two verbs in translation, because the resulting meaning seems clearer to me, but in German there is but one verb (war..eingestellt).
    See also elroy's suggestion #10.
    Nothing was done with delicacy, everything with raucous directness:tick:: it's the gist of it.
     
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