aumento en 50% / aumento del 50%

cz_pececita

Member
English - USA
I'm working on a translation assignment for an article on world hunger and have encountered both "Problema aumento en 50 por ciento desde 1990", and "hemos visto un aumento del numero de hambrientos del 50 por ciento en toda la region". My reflex was to translate both as an increase by 50%. Can someone verify this for me? What is the difference between saying:


aumentar en 50 por ciento
aumentar el 50 por ciento
un aumento...del 50 por ciento


?


Gracias!!
 
  • Búkarus

    Senior Member
    Colombia, castellano
    Hi,
    "El problema se aumentó en un 50 por ciento desde 1990"
    "hemos visto un aumento del número de hambrientos del 50 por ciento en toda la región".

    aumentar en 50 por ciento
    aumentar el 50 por ciento
    un aumento del 50 por ciento
    ¡Gracias!!
    Since "by" may result too generic, I'll try to use other prepositions (please, shome my mistakes in this attempts):

    Aumentar en un/el 50 por ciento —> to grow [around/exactly] 50%. <—Usually non countable or indivisible concepts, like quality, a problem or a mass.
    Aumentar un/el 50 por ciento —> to receive an addition of [around/exactly] 50%. <—Usually countable or divisible concepts, like inhabitants, a measure or an amount.
    Aumentar a/hasta un/el50 por ciento —> to increase until [around/exactly] 50%. <—Expressing a limit.

    That usage and ommisions of prepositions is not due to the percentage expression but the verb's sense: aumentar en dos, reducirse a la tercera parte, elevarse hasta las nubes, inflarse en un 30%, agregar la mitad, restar el 50%, etc.

    In the following, "50 por ciento" works as an attribute of "aumento":
    Un aumento del 50 por ciento = an increase of 50%.
    Un aumento de un 50 por ciento = an increase of around 50%.

    Bye :)
     

    javier8907

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    "El problema aumentó en un 50%" is perfect without "se", and the alternative "se aumentó" is not considered appropriate for example in Spain (unless the meaning is "se ha aumentado a sí mismo"), although it might be common and totally acceptable in some countries of Latin America.
     

    Búkarus

    Senior Member
    Colombia, castellano
    Hi,
    Wait, Javier. "Se aumentó" is not exclusively a reflexive form. It may also be a passive reflexive voice meaning "fue aumentado (was increased)" or used as an impersonal conjugation.

    So "se aumentó en un 50%" is no inappropriate, in an appropiate context, of course.
    Bye :)
     
    Last edited:

    jaunis

    Senior Member
    Argentina, español
    I'm working on a translation assignment for an article on world hunger and have encountered both "Problema aumento en 50 por ciento desde 1990", and "hemos visto un aumento del numero de hambrientos del 50 por ciento en toda la region". My reflex was to translate both as an increase by 50%. Can someone verify this for me? What is the difference between saying:


    aumentar en 50 por ciento
    aumentar el 50 por ciento
    un aumento...del 50 por ciento


    ?

    In argentina is exactly the same.

    Aumento del 50%
    Aumentó en 50%
    Aumentar en 50%

    The most used, however, is "del 50%". Argentina registró un aumento del 50% en...(blabla).

    Ah I don't know about your assignment, but here in argentina we never use "por ciento" in written spanish. We use the % symbol unless we say something like "cien por ciento"(amér) o "ciento por ciento"(esp) (100%)
     

    Búkarus

    Senior Member
    Colombia, castellano
    Hi,
    That's a point, Juanis. I didn't see any problem when writing "50 por ciento" but you made me realized that, when I write the number, I use the symbol (50%). And when I write the number as words, I keep writing words: cincuenta por ciento.

    In a technical context, I would go with digits and symbol: El proyecto ha avanzado en un 20%.
    In informal contexts or figurative expressions, I prefer words: Tu ánimo parece haber bajado al diez por ciento.

    Bye :)
     
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    Pinairun

    Senior Member
    In Spanish, we must write:
    1% or uno por ciento (but not 1 por ciento)
    2% or dos por ciento (but not 2 por ciento)
    3% or tres por ciento (but not 3 por ciento)
    ...
    9% or nueve por ciento (but not 9 por ciento)
    10% or diez por ciento, (but not 10 por ciento)

    but, the following will be:

    11%, 12%, 13%, 14%, ...
    50%
    60%
    ...

    Read always %: "por ciento", except 100% that can be: "cien por cien", "cien por ciento" or "ciento por ciento".
     

    cz_pececita

    Member
    English - USA
    Ok, but in English it is most colloquial to say something "increases by something"

    Obviously, a direct Spanish translation, "aumentar por" must not be correct. So how does one say "increases by" in Spanish? Both "aumentar en" and "aumentar el" are fine?
     

    jaunis

    Senior Member
    Argentina, español
    Ok, but in English it is most colloquial to say something "increases by something"

    Obviously, a direct Spanish translation, "aumentar por" must not be correct. So how does one say "increases by" in Spanish? Both "aumentar en" and "aumentar el" are fine?

    "aumentar en un"
    "aumentar el"

    At least here in Argentina.
     

    Búkarus

    Senior Member
    Colombia, castellano
    Hi,
    Obviously, a direct Spanish translation, "aumentar por" must not be correct. So how does one say "increases by" in Spanish? Both "aumentar en" and "aumentar el" are fine?
    I tried to explain that in post #2.

    The "en" (introducing an increment), the "a" (introducing a final value) or the "hasta" (introducing a limit) comes with the verb; sometimes the verb doesn't require a preposition. The percentage is mostly preceeded by an article (un/el) according to the accuracy you mean (around/exactly).

    Bye :)
     
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