auntie or cleaner

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering which term is more idiomatic or there is a better choice:

1) You can ask the key from that auntie.

2)You can ask the key from that cleaner.

Thoughts and context: I am looking for a term to address this person who is responsible to cleaning the floors and collecting the garbage. I thought cleaner is too rude to refer to her.
 
  • You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In any case, "from" doesn't suit the context. "You can ask the .....(person) for the key."
    Got it. Thank you very much.

    In Australia we call them 'cleaners'. I think they call them 'janitors' in the USA.

    Janitor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    A janitor (American English, Scottish English), custodian (British English), janitress (female), cleaner or caretaker is a person who cleans and maintains buildings such as hospitals, schools and residential accommodation. Janitors' primary responsibility is as a cleaner. In some cases, they will also carry out maintenance and security duties.
    Got it. Thank you very much.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    If the woman is present and you are talking about her, and you don't know her name, I think "cleaning lady" sounds polite. Maybe it isn't politically correct nowadays though —I find it difficult to keep up with all that.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    If the woman is present and you are talking about her, and you don't know her name, I think "cleaning lady" sounds polite. Maybe it isn't politically correct nowadays though —I find it difficult to keep up with all that.
    Got it. Thank you very much.
     
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