Austrian accent?

Hi Germans and Austrians and all the German speaking people!

Yesterday I watched a horrible Austrian movie -I mean it was really good- I noticed some features that might be of Austrian accent.

One of the actors pronounced "machst" like "mochst" and "hast" like "host". And also people would say "es tut mir laad" instead of "es tut mir leid". Is this Austrian accent???
 
  • gabrigabri

    Senior Member
    Italian, Italy (Torino)
    Hi Germans and Austrians and all the German speaking people!

    Yesterday I watched a horrible Austrian movie -I mean it was really good- I noticed some features that might be of Austrian accent.

    One of the actors pronounced "machst" like "mochst" and "hast" like "host". And also people would say "es tut mir laad" instead of "es tut mir leid". Is this Austrian accent???

    Hi!

    Yes, it is definitely Austrian accent.

    For example if you look the first scene, he says:

    Wennst's mir so froagst (fragst), naa (nein)... sicher, kloar (klar)!
    (she asked if he wants to drink a "glaserl" at her place)
     

    EvilWillow

    Senior Member
    German (Germany)
    In the aforementioned first scene it's not "merely" an Austrian accent, but a dialect (similar to Bavarian, by the way). It's no wonder that this should cause some troubles with understanding.
     

    EvilWillow

    Senior Member
    German (Germany)
    Sorry to break the news, but neither all Germans nor all Austrians speak Hochdeutsch. ;) There are (region-specific) dialects all over the countries!
     

    Acrolect

    Senior Member
    German, Austria
    Yes, I know that but people in "Vienna", for instance, speak Hochdeutsch, not a Bavarian dialect, right?
    There are different standard forms of German, one of them is Austrian Standard German, which differs in some areas of pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary from German German. It is a Standard in its own right and not - as is often assumed (mostly by our German-speaking neighbours) - a regional variety of German (nor a separate language), which means it is codified and is taught in educational institutions in Austria. As the largest part of Austria belongs to the Bavarian dialect area (Bavarian is a technical and abstract term here and should not be confused with what we commonly understand by a Bavarian dialect), the Austrian Standard would show more features of this.

    In addition to the Austrian Standard, there are - as everywhere - further regional and social varieties of Austrian German, e.g. Viennese German (supposedly the variety used in the film), Tyrolean German, etc., partly differing quite significantly from the Standard and from each other.
     
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