Auto-conclusive books

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bellelsa

New Member
Italian
Hello! :)
I was wondering whether the word "auto-conclusive" (talking about books) is commonly used or not. And if it's not, are there more commonly used words to define an auto-conclusive book?
[An auto-conclusive book is a book that does not have a sequel, but ends with itself.]
 
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I have never heard of it. I would call such a book 'self-contained'. Maybe it is a technical term.
     

    bellelsa

    New Member
    Italian
    I've found the term on the net, translating it from Italian. In my language (Italian) it's rather common among book lovers. Never heard "self-contained", but it sounds far more effective than "auto-conclusive" :)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    In short, no, it is not commonly used. I have never heard it and I couldn't find much evidence if it by googling.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    That sounds to me like "a book".
    But I have to admit that when I compare books published now with books published some decades ago, I can see the need for a term to describe a book that has no sequel. I am amazed that so much current fiction is based on series that really need to be read in sequence. To take a simple example, consider Agatha Christie and Jo Nesbo. You can read Poirot in any order, but if you read Harry Hole in the wrong order you come across all kinds of plot spoilers - there is an underlying narrative in the Nesbo series.

    So, back to the point, we need a term for a book that stands alone.
    I don't like "auto-conclusive" - yuk.
    I don't like "self-contained" much, though it is a lot better - the term exists already.

    I wonder do publishers have a favoured term?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    No such term exists in AE, either in general or in the book-publishing industry; as Panjandrum says, a book that isn't part of a series is simply a book. If a book is part of a series, or a revised edition of an earlier work, that is so stated.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    What about a book that was intended to be self-contained, but sold so well the author produced a sequel?

    The original book is still 'self-contained' in that it can read by itself, but in another way has become linked with the sequel yet is not really a prequel.

    Panj is right. Let's just call them books!
     

    bellelsa

    New Member
    Italian
    Of course they are all books but I was simply asking whether the term was used or not in the common language.
    And calling them all books without distinctions could be treacherous in some cases. For instance I need to ask a friend if she prefers self-contained (now using this word!) books or book series. I prefer self-contained books.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Of course they are all books but I was simply asking whether the term was used or not in the common language.
    And calling them all books without distinctions could be treacherous in some cases. For instance I need to ask a friend if she prefers self-contained (now using this word!) books or book series. I prefer self-contained books.
    From the above posts, I suggest that "self-contained" is not the term to use. Better to talk about "stand-alone" books.

    HERE is an example of that expression in use. Scroll to the end of the link to find:
    The author of the best-selling Harry Hole series now gives us an electrifying stand-alone novel set inside Oslo’s maze of especially venal, high-level corruption.
     

    bellelsa

    New Member
    Italian
    From the above posts, I suggest that "self-contained" is not the term to use. Better to talk about "stand-alone" books.

    HERE is an example of that expression in use. Scroll to the end of the link to find:
    But from the above posts I say stand-alone isn't right in this case. I quote ain'translationfun?: "In the works of author who are best known for a series of books with a common protagonist, I think such books are called "stand-alone"."
    A self-contained book is a book which starts and ends with itself, it doesn't have a prequel, a sequel or a common protagonist such as Hercule Poirot in Agatha Christie's books.
     
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