Automobile

Do you like cars ? What do you see in cars that makes you like them?
But first of all how do you say automobile in your language ? :)

From French automobile, from Ancient Greek αὐτός (autós, “self”) + French mobile (“moving”), from Latin mōbilis (“movable”).
Automobile = "self-moving, self-movable,"


Polish

samochód = automobile
samochody (plural)

sam (alone)+ -o- + chód (gait)

pojazd = vehicle
wehikuł czasu = time machine

auto = automobile
wóz = wagon , cart
fura = cart
 
  • In Greek it's «αυτοκίνητο» [a.fto̞ˈci.ni.to̞] (neut.), a word calqued for the French automobile; a compound: Classical reflexive pronoun «αὐτός» autós + Classical deverbative adj. «κινητός» kĭnētós --> moving, movable < Classical v. «κῑνέω/κῑνῶ» kīnéō (uncontracted)/kīnô (contracted).
    Plural: «Αυτοκίνητα» [a.fto̞ˈci.ni.ta] (neut. nom.).

    In the vernacular it's «αμάξι» [aˈma.k͡si] (neut. nom. sing.), «αμάξια» [aˈma.k͡sça] (neut. nom. pl.) < Byz.Gr. neuter diminutive «ἁμάξι(ο)ν» amáksi(o)n --> little wagon < Classical feminine noun «ἅμαξᾱ» hắmaksā --> wagon, coach, a compound: Classical adverb «ἅμα» hắmă + Classical 3rd declension masc. noun «ἄξων» ắksōn (nom. sing.), «ἄξονος» ắksŏnŏs (gen. sing.) --> axle (PIE *h₂eḱs- axle, axis old inherited IE noun present in many languages e.g. Skt. अक्ष (akṣa), axle, axis, balance beam, Lat. axis, Proto-Balto-Slavic *aśís, Proto-Germanic *ahsō, Proto-Slavic *osь etc.).

    Vehicle: «Όχημα» [ˈo̞.çi.ma] (neut. nom.sing.), «οχήματα» [o̞ˈçi.ma.ta] (neut. nom. pl.) < Classical deverbative neut. noun «ὄχημα» ókʰēmă --> wagon, vehicle, cart, carriage < Classical mediopassive v. «ὀχέομαι/ὀχοῦμαι» ŏkʰéŏmai (uncontracted)/ŏkʰoûmai (contracted) --> to drive < Classical v. «ἔχω» ékʰō --> to transport (not to be confused with «ἔχω» ékʰō --> to have, the two are unrelated), from an earlier form «*ϝέχω» *wékʰō, cognate with Latin vehere, to carry, bear, Skt. वहति (vahati), to drive, transport, Proto-Germanic *weganą, to move, carry (PIE *ue̯ǵʰ- to transport, carry).

    Edit: Added όχημα
     
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    Cork Irish

    Senior Member
    British English
    In Irish:
    1. carr (this word is of Celtic origin, by the way, but I don't know if Irish borrowed this from English, which got it from Gaulish/Celtic?)
    2. mótar (motor car)
    3. gluaisteán (automobile). Gluais is a verb meaning "move, proceed". Gluaiste is the verbal adjective. And then a generic ending -án is added to turn it into the noun automobile.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan:

    automòbil (general technical word)
    cotxe ['koʧə] (general common word) < either from Spanish or French coche, from German Kotsche, from Hungarian kosci (szekér) "carriage of Kocs", where it was first made.

    Informal or local variants:
    auto
    cotxo
    votura
    (North Catalonia)
     

    raamez

    New Member
    Arabic
    Arabic:
    sayyarah سيّارة (automobile/car) used to be the word for caravan in ancient times and was revived after the invention of automobiles. It derives from s-y-r to move

    markabah مركبة (Vehicle) from r-k-b to ride/to get on, a cognate with the famous Israeli tank merkava. The word itself is at least five thousand years old

    maqTurah مقطورة (wagon) to be part of a qiTaar قطار. QiTaar in modern Arabic means train but in ancient times used to mean a convoy of camels. Another derivation of q-T-r is qaTreeb قطريب (one of the attaching parts inside a yoke)

    araba عربة (cart) has no good explanation in Arabic and is thought to be of Persian origin or of some other Iranian languages.
     
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    ...
    araba عربة (cart) has no good explanation in Arabic and is thought to be of Persian origin or of some other Iranian languages.
    This word exists (or rather it existed, it's considered obsolete nowadays) in Greek as «αραμπάς» [a.ɾaˈbas] (masc.) and described the four-wheeled horse drawn carriage, it comes from Ottoman Turkish and it's present in many traditional folk songs, especially those folk songs the Greeks of Anatolia and Constantinople (Istanbul) brought with them, after the Greco-Turkish population exchange of 1923-24:
    click me for a traditional folk song
    An arabas's passing by, raising clouds of dust,
    pull up your little dress 'cause it will gather dust.

    An arabas's passing by, the driver has a limp, so,
    step aside little girls 'cause he will run you over.

    An arabas's passing by, an arabas full of sweepings,
    so come out girls from Fassoulas (a neighbourhood in Smyrna/Izmir) even if clogs you're wearing.

    I've told you once in Kassabas (present-day Basmahane, Izmir), I've told you twice in Kordelio (present-day Karşıyaka, Izmir)
    I've told you three times not to marry.
     

    raamez

    New Member
    Arabic
    This word exists (or rather it existed, it's considered obsolete nowadays) in Greek as «αραμπάς» [a.ɾaˈbas] (masc.) and described the four-wheeled horse drawn carriage, it comes from Ottoman Turkish and it's present in many traditional folk songs, especially those folk songs the Greeks of Anatolia and Constantinople (Istanbul) brought with them, after the Greco-Turkish population exchange of 1923-24:
    click me for a traditional folk song
    An arabas's passing by, raising clouds of dust,
    pull up your little dress 'cause it will gather dust.

    An arabas's passing by, the driver has a limp, so,
    step aside little girls 'cause he will run you over.

    An arabas's passing by, an arabas full of sweepings,
    so come out girls from Fassoulas (a neighbourhood in Smyrna/Izmir) even if clogs you're wearing.

    I've told you once in Kassabas (present-day Basmahane, Izmir), I've told you twice in Kordelio (present-day Karşıyaka, Izmir)
    I've told you three times not to marry.
    Maybe it is only me but the beginning reminds me of baali ma3ak by the Syrian Armenian singer lena shamamian
     

    Linnets

    Senior Member
    Note that in Russian, the informal word is also маши́на (mashina), I guess both come from Latin machina (machine/engine).
    Yes but Latin word māchina actually comes from Doric Greek μαχανά (Ionic/Attic μηχανή) 'mechanical device'. The Russian word probably took two intermediate steps: машина < (German) Maschine < (French) machine < māchina < μαχανά.
     
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    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    cotxe ['koʧə] (general common word) < either from Spanish or French coche, from German Kotsche, from Hungarian kocsi (szekér) "carriage of Kocs", where it was first made.
    In Hungarian we usually say "kocsi" /'koʧi/ or "autó".

    :thumbsup:I find it amazing that such a common word which spread all over Europe (+English "coach") comes from the name of a Hungarian village. (It's near the city of Győr.)
     

    Cork Irish

    Senior Member
    British English
    In Hungarian we usually say "kocsi" /'koʧi/ or "autó".

    :thumbsup:I find it amazing that such a common word which spread all over Europe (+English "coach") comes from the name of a Hungarian village. (It's near the city of Győr.)
    The Irish version is cóiste. /ko:ʃtʹi/. It means "coach" (not "car"). There are a number of words in Irish where ʧ is transposed into ʃtʹ (the t is palatalised).
     
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    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Technically, if counting Hispanic America, what most people say is carro.

    And in the Southern Cone people say auto.

    I guess if we have to include it all we should add máquina for Cuba, coche in Mexico City and Buenos Aires, I believe.

    Note that in Russian, the informal word is also маши́на (mashina), I guess both come from Latin machina (machine/engine).
    I think it must come directly from the French machine, otherwise it would probably have a k sound like máquina or machina.


    For the original question, I think cognates of the word "automobile" exist in every language. L'automobile is feminine in French and Italian, but masculine in Spanish el automóvil and Portuguese o automóvel and neuter in German das Automobil and Dutch het automobiel. The variation in gender is interesting.

    Edit: crossposted with Olaszinhok. I was writing the same idea when he answered!
     
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    Linnets

    Senior Member
    At the beginning of the automobile era, in Italian the gender was masculine: gli automobili. But D'Annunzio and common people (association with macchina?) started considering it a feminine noun.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    I think it must come directly from the French machine
    I don't think they went through French because in French, machine(*) never meant car/automobile, but always engine/mechanical device.

    (*) Although Serge Gainsbourg used the word to speak of a motorcycle:
    Je ne reconnais plus personne
    En Harley Davidson
    Quand je sens en chemin
    Les trépidations de ma machine
    Il me monte des désirs
    Dans le creux de mes reins
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    @Yendred Maybe it could have meant automobile when they were first invented in the 19th century and then it lost that meaning? The thing is the k > sh is a typical French change. There are hundreds of words with ch in modern French that correspond to c/k in all other languages. There is also definitely the "sh" sound there in the "mashina" of Russian, Armenian, Romanian, Hebrew.... We have to explain where that came from.
    Edit: I found one historical example of machine as car:
    Je connais assez mal les choses de l'automobile et, pourtant, chaque fois que je vois un homme installé au volant de sa machine, il me semble que je découvre tout ce qu'il y a de plus secret dans les profondeurs de sa nature (Duhamel, Passion J. Pasquier, 1945, p.117).
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    I guess if we have to include it all we should add máquina for Cuba, coche in Mexico City and Buenos Aires, I believe.

    I've heard some Mexicans say coche, but I've never heard any Porteños say anything but auto. Any Argentinians around to confirm it?
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    @Penyafort A random Buenos Aires article uses 4 autos, 1 coche, and 1 vehículo. Another article 1 coche, 1 camioneta. One from Uruguay with only coche.
    Seems like auto is more frequent but coche is more elegant.

    This Mexican article tries to teach readers how to distinguish coche, carro and auto for specific uses. Basically for the writer coche is a vehicle that transports people, carro is a vehicle that transports things and auto is a vehicle that is automatic.
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    @merquiades I wonder if, whether in Mexico it's a regional variation, maybe in Argentina it's a generational one. I don't recall Argentinians saying coche, but it's also true that it's not a word that surprises them, so there must be indeed people who use it. I've also heard people use auto in Spain, but very few and usually old people from villages.
     
    In Greek it's «αυτοκίνητο» [a.fto̞ˈci.ni.to̞] (neut.), a word calqued for the French automobile; a compound: Classical reflexive pronoun «αὐτός» autós + Classical deverbative adj. «κινητός» kĭnētós --> moving, movable < Classical v. «κῑνέω/κῑνῶ» kīnéō (uncontracted)/kīnô (contracted).
    Plural: «Αυτοκίνητα» [a.fto̞ˈci.ni.ta] (neut. nom.).

    In the vernacular it's «αμάξι» [aˈma.k͡si] (neut. nom. sing.), «αμάξια» [aˈma.k͡sça] (neut. nom. pl.) < Byz.Gr. neuter diminutive «ἁμάξι(ο)ν» amáksi(o)n --> little wagon < Classical feminine noun «ἅμαξᾱ» hắmaksā --> wagon, coach, a compound: Classical adverb «ἅμα» hắmă + Classical 3rd declension masc. noun «ἄξων» ắksōn (nom. sing.), «ἄξονος» ắksŏnŏs (gen. sing.) --> axle (PIE *h₂eḱs- axle, axis old inherited IE noun present in many languages e.g. Skt. अक्ष (akṣa), axle, axis, balance beam, Lat. axis, Proto-Balto-Slavic *aśís, Proto-Germanic *ahsō, Proto-Slavic *osь etc.).

    Vehicle: «Όχημα» [ˈo̞.çi.ma] (neut. nom.sing.), «οχήματα» [o̞ˈçi.ma.ta] (neut. nom. pl.) < Classical deverbative neut. noun «ὄχημα» ókʰēmă --> wagon, vehicle, cart, carriage < Classical mediopassive v. «ὀχέομαι/ὀχοῦμαι» ŏkʰéŏmai (uncontracted)/ŏkʰoûmai (contracted) --> to drive < Classical v. «ἔχω» ékʰō --> to transport (not to be confused with «ἔχω» ékʰō --> to have, the two are unrelated), from an earlier form «*ϝέχω» *wékʰō, cognate with Latin vehere, to carry, bear, Skt. वहति (vahati), to drive, transport, Proto-Germanic *weganą, to move, carry (PIE *ue̯ǵʰ- to transport, carry).

    Edit: Added όχημα

    In Polish wehikuł (vehicle) «pojazd, zwłaszcza dziwaczny lub staromodny» (vehicle, especially bizarre or old-fashioned).
    But curiously we can't say ''pojazd czasu'' , only in this case we say: wehikuł czasu = time machine

    wehikuł = w powieściach lub filmach fantastycznonaukowych: urządzenie przenoszące ludzi w przeszłość lub przyszłość (in the novels or fantastic films: a device transferring people into a past or future)

    Wagon = pojazd służący do przewozu osób, ładunków lub urządzeń w kolejowym transporcie lądowym (a vehicle for transporting persons, cargo or devices in railing terrestrial transport)

    English

    Wagon
    "four-wheeled vehicle to carry heavy loads," late 15c., from Middle Dutch wagen, waghen, from Proto-Germanic *wagna- (source also of Old English wægn, Modern English wain, Old Saxon and Old High German wagan, Old Norse vagn, Old Frisian wein, German Wagen), from Proto-Indo-European *wogh-no-, suffixed form of root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle" (source also of Latin vehiculum). It is thus related to way.

    In Dutch and German, it is the general word for "a wheel vehicle;" its use in English is a result of contact through Flemish immigration, Dutch trade, or the Continental wars. It has largely displaced the native cognate, wain. Spelling preference varied randomly between -g- and -gg- from mid-18c., until American English settled on the etymological wagon, while waggon remained common in Great Britain. Wagon-train is attested from 1810. Phrase on the wagon "abstaining from alcohol" is attested by 1904, originally on the water cart.

    In Irish:
    1. carr (this word is of Celtic origin, by the way, but I don't know if Irish borrowed this from English, which got it from Gaulish/Celtic?)
    2. mótar (motor car)
    3. gluaisteán (automobile). Gluais is a verb meaning "move, proceed". Gluaiste is the verbal adjective. And then a generic ending -án is added to turn it into the noun automobile.
    car
    c. 1300, "wheeled vehicle," from Anglo-French carre, Old North French carre, from Vulgar Latin *carra, related to Latin carrum, carrus (plural carra), originally "two-wheeled Celtic war chariot," from Gaulish karros, a Celtic word (compare Old Irish and Welsh carr "cart, wagon," Breton karr "chariot"), from PIE *krsos, from root *kers- "to run."

    "From 16th to 19th c. chiefly poetic, with associations of dignity, solemnity, or splendour ..." [OED]. Used in U.S. by 1826 of railway freight carriages and of passenger coaches on a railway by 1830; by 1862 of streetcars or tramway cars. Extension to "automobile" is by 1896, but from 1831 to the first decade of 20c. the cars meant "railroad train." Car bomb first attested 1972, in reference to Northern Ireland. The Latin word also is the source of Italian and Spanish carro, French char.
    Let's note that in French, the most common word is actually "voiture":
    And what about ''bagnole'' ..? ;)
    Probable dérivé, d’après le modèle de carriole, de banne, du bas latin benna, mot gaulois « sorte de chariot à quatre roues »

    Spanish from Spain: automóvil (formal), coche (what most people says in daily life)
    I was just curious about ''coche'' (definición)! ;)

    Del húngaro kocsi 'carruaje'.

    1. m. Automóvil destinado al transporte de personas y con capacidad no superior a siete plazas.
    2. m. Carruaje de cuatro ruedas de tracción animal, con una caja, dentro de la cual hay asiento para dos o más personas.
    3. m. Vagón del tren o del metro.

    Italian

    Formal: automobile, autovettura, autoveicolo.
    Informal: auto, macchina.
    Note that in Russian, the informal word is also маши́на (mashina), I guess both come from Latin machina (machine/engine).

    In Polish we can say , for example when you see a Ferrari on the street = ale maszyna ! :rolleyes:
     
    Arabic:
    sayyarah سيّارة (automobile/car) used to be the word for caravan in ancient times and was revived after the invention of automobiles. It derives from s-y-r to move

    markabah مركبة (Vehicle) from r-k-b to ride/to get on, a cognate with the famous Israeli tank merkava. The word itself is at least five thousand years old

    maqTurah مقطورة (wagon) to be part of a qiTaar قطار. QiTaar in modern Arabic means train but in ancient times used to mean a convoy of camels. Another derivation of q-T-r is qaTreeb قطريب (one of the attaching parts inside a yoke)

    araba عربة (cart) has no good explanation in Arabic and is thought to be of Persian origin or of some other Iranian languages.

    How do you say in Arabic ?

    (to) go by car ?
    (to) go by foot ?
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    I know that robot comes from Polish

    _____

    @Yendred I think you'll find that 'robot' comes from Czech. (Well, the English version does, anyway!) See the play by K. Capek, RUR or 'Rossum's Universal Robots' (1920).
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I think it must come directly from the French machine
    The German intermediate is quite likely, and it's impossible to tell for sure. Obviously it wasn't loaned from Latin directly.

    Regarding Russian, I'd like to add dated colloquial авто (avtó) and modern slangish тачка (táchka, lit. "wheelbarrow"). And, of course, the formal general term автомобиль (avtomobíl').
     

    Linnets

    Senior Member

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    My apologies to my brother-in-law and other Czechs in omitting the haček in Čapek.

    (You may have noticed I spell my own name wrong on here not being able to add a circumflex to my 'o'.)
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    How do you say in Arabic ?

    (to) go by car ?
    (to) go by foot ?
    May I hijack the answer? Greek is interesting in that, for (to) go by car we use a periphrasis: «με το αυτοκίνητο/αμάξι» [ˈme̞ ˈto̞ a.fto̞ˈci.ni.to̞] or [ˈme̞ ˈto̞ aˈma.k͡si] --> lit. with the car, while to express going somewhere by foot we use an ancient adverb that has been reintroduced with Katharevousa and is commonly used: «πεζή» [pe̞ˈzi] --> by land, on foot < Classical adverb of manner «πεζῇ» pĕzê̩ (idem), a pseudo-dativisation and adverbialization of Classical adjective «πεζός, -ζή, -ζόν» pĕzós (masc.), pĕzḗ (fem.), pĕzón (neut.) --> traveller on land by foot, pedestrian < Classical neuter 3rd declension noun «πούς» poús (nom. sing.), «ποδός» pŏdós (gen. sing.).
     

    raamez

    New Member
    Arabic
    May I hijack the answer? Greek is interesting in that, for (to) go by car we use a periphrasis: «με το αυτοκίνητο/αμάξι» [ˈme̞ ˈto̞ a.fto̞ˈci.ni.to̞] or [ˈme̞ ˈto̞ aˈma.k͡si] --> lit. with the car, while to express going somewhere by foot we use an ancient adverb that has been reintroduced with Katharevousa and is commonly used: «πεζή» [pe̞ˈzi] --> by land, on foot < Classical adverb of manner «πεζῇ» pĕzê̩ (idem), a pseudo-dativisation and adverbialization of Classical adjective «πεζός, -ζή, -ζόν» pĕzós (masc.), pĕzḗ (fem.), pĕzón (neut.) --> traveller on land by foot, pedestrian < Classical neuter 3rd declension noun «πούς» poús (nom. sing.), «ποδός» pŏdós (gen. sing.).
    Interesting! the word for man in Arabic is rajul derives from rijl leg/foot through a semantic shift from traveller by foot -> man.
     
    Thank you all :thank you: I mistook the Czech origin with Polish. My bad. Happily you rectified it :thumbsup:
    Robot is drawn from an old Church Slavonic word, robota, for “servitude,” “forced labor” or “drudgery.” The word, which also has cognates in German, Russian, Polish and Czech, was a product of the central European system of serfdom by which a tenant’s rent was paid for in forced labor or service. In early drafts of his play, Čapek named these creatures labori, after the Latinat root for labor, but worried that the term sounded too “bookish.” At the suggestion of his brother, Josef, Čapek ultimately opted for roboti, or in English, robots.

    The Origin Of The Word 'Robot'
     
    How do you pronounce maszyna?

    Out of topic: I don't know from which language comes maszyna, but I know that robot comes from Polish :p

    maszyna = IPA: [maˈʃɨ̃na], AS: [mašna]

    It's quite funny.., in Polish you can call somebody a maszyna , not a robot.. (osoba wykonująca coś automatycznie i bezmyślnie).
    A person performing something automatically and thoughtlessly..


    Curiously machine in some Slavic languages ( Serbo-Croatian , Slovene , Macedonian ?) has a different origin !

    In Czech exists mašina and stroj .

    From Old Czech stroj, from Proto-Slavic *strojь.

    Bulgarian
    строй • ‎(stroj) = system, order, regime

    Russian
    стро́ить (stróitʹ)= to build, construct , make , form, dress up

    Polish

    stroić (verb) = to adorn, to deck, to decorate, to embellish , to tune a musical instrument , to overdress.
    stroić (Old Polish) = to do , make , perform, perpetrate

    strój (noun)
    • tune
    • costume
    • dress
    • apparel
    • attire
    • attirement
    • get-up
    • getup
    • outfit
    • fancy dress

    Polish (Aleksander Brückner 1927)

    strój, stroić, strojny; nastrój, nastrajać; strojniś (w 17. wieku i strojnat); stroisz, ‘dzierżak’; strój dziś o ‘ubiorze’, pierwotnie tylko o ‘przyborach’ wszelakich: »wszelkiego stroja spiewającego«, biblja (»wszelkiej muzyki«, Leopolita), stroić w psałterzu i i. zawsze tylko ‘czynić, działać' (np. złość itp.), ale i: »palce stroili są żałtarz«; w biblji »stroić gody«, ‘urządzać’, »strojący synów«, ‘przełożeni ich’; »stroje bobrowe« (por. wyraz: potrzeby), »stroje męskie«; strój, ‘sposób’; w cerk. stroj ‘rząd’, stroiti ‘sposobić’, u Słowieńców i Serbów stroiti ‘garbować skórę’, rus. stroj ‘rząd, szereg’; od pnia strei-. U Czechów stroj ‘maszyna, mechanizm’.
     
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    Linnets

    Senior Member
    maszyna = IPA: [maˈʃɨ̃na]
    That's the same transcription I posted. ;)

    It's quite funny.., in Polish you can call somebody a maszyna , not a robot.. [...]
    A person performing something automatically and thoughtlessly..
    Same in Italian, but you can call macchina a robot and also a computer, that's common especially among computer nerds.
    The word macchina and similar has adapted to the various circumstances of different eras: in Ancient world it was a war machine, in the Middle Ages it was mill grinds (macina), in the Industrial Era a mechanical loom or a steam device, then a car and now a computer.
     
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    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    The Georgian word for "car" is მანქანა (mankana), which comes from Greek μᾱχᾰνᾱ́ (mākhanā́), with an extra "n" added for some reason.

    Georgian uses two different verbs to express possession, one for objects:

    1) I have a house, a book, a key, a coat, etc...

    and one for living beings (humans or animals):

    2) I have a brother, a daughter, a horse, a dog, etc.

    Now can you guess which type of "have" they use when they say "I have a car"?
    The second one, of course, because cars are not just objects, they have a "soul"!:)

    OK, the real reason is probably just an analogy with horses, which Georgians used for most of their history to get around.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    The Georgian word for "car" is მანქანა (mankana), which comes from Greek μᾱχᾰνᾱ́ (mākhanā́), with an extra "n" added for some reason.
    Perhaps, an old form of Georgian had borrowed the Anc. Greek word to describe something else initially?


    OK, the real reason is probably just an analogy with horses, which Georgians used for most of their history to get around.
     
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    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Same in Italian, but you can call macchina a robot and also a computer, that's common especially among computer nerds.
    In Russian using "машина" for a computer is possible, although that usage sounds a bit dated to me, bringing computer classes in mind (here it's an apparent contraction from elektrónno-vychislítel'naya mashina, lit. "electronic-calculation machine", also abbreviated as ЭВМ /E.Ve.éM/, - a really formal term).
    in Polish you can call somebody a maszyna , not a robot
    In Russian it will be "a robot", unlikely "a machine" (probably because the latter is semantically overloaded).
     
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