Auxilliary Verb 주다 Usage in Imperative Sentence

bkkc

New Member
English (US)
When using the auxillary verb 주다 when asking someone to do something, is it only used when the action would benefit you personally, or can it be used more generally, just to add politeness, in the way that sometimes people in English add "for me" or "do me a favor and.." to an imperative statement?

For example, even though it's not *personally for your benefit* would it make sense to say something like:
왼쪽에서 앉아주세요. (Sit on the left side please.)

or would simply: 왼쪽에서 앉으세요. be better or more sensible?
 
  • Kross

    Senior Member
    Korean
    The helping verb 주다 is usually used to just add politeness to a sentence, but there may be a situation where the verb can do the double jobs you mentioned at the same time. For example, 제 보고서도 같이 내주실 수 있어요? 집에 일이 생겨서 지금 가봐야 해요. (Can you please turn in my report for me? Something bad came up at home. So I have to go home right away.)
     

    maidchen

    Member
    Korean
    Hi, bkkc.
    "왼쪽에서" is incorrect, so the correct form of it is "왼쪽에" in this situation. :)
    I think both of them are polite expressions, but the first sentence "왼쪽에 앉아 주세요." sounds more polite than the second one. Of course, if you say them to others, it's important to speak in a polite tone.
     

    bkkc

    New Member
    English (US)
    Why is 에서 wrong? I don't really get that, since "sitting" is an action at that location. Could you explain that, please?

    EDIT: I just now asked a Korean person, in Korea, about this exact sentence, and she said that, in fact, 에서 is correct.....so ummmmm.....hmmmmmmmmm??????
     
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    bkkc

    New Member
    English (US)
    Could this be a difference in dialect between Seoul where maidchen is from and 경상도 where I am sitting now? Most interesting.
     

    Kross

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Why is 에서 wrong? I don't really get that, since "sitting" is an action at that location. Could you explain that, please?
    I cannot wrap my brain around what your friend said. I think the 에서 doesn't fit in the sentence. It just doesn't sound natural to me. If you want to use the 에서 here, you need to add 부터 after 에서 like 왼쪽에서부터 앉아 주세요.

    Could this be a difference in dialect between Seoul where maidchen is from and 경상도 where I am sitting now? Most interesting.
    Dialects have nothing to do with this question.
     

    Rance

    Senior Member
    Korean
    The difference in meaning between -에 and -에서 is not that much clear in many occasions.
    However they are not often interchangeable.
    Their usage seems to be dependent on 서술어 that follows.

    Type I - Interchangeable
    그는 한국에서 산다 (O)
    그는 한국에 산다 (O)

    Type II - Not interchangeable
    왼쪽에 앉으세요.(O)
    왼쪽에서 앉으세요.(X)

    학생들은 교실에 남았다.(O)
    학생들은 교실에서 남았다.(X)

    학생들은 교실에 공부한다.(X)
    학생들은 교실에서 공부한다.(O)

    Type III - Different meaning
    그는 미국에 왔다. (He arrived USA.)
    그는 미국에서 왔다. (He came from USA.)

    Rule of thumb:
    In the case of type ii, you can mostly differentiate the usage by the type of 서술어 you use.

    If 서술어 is a verb describing an action, you should probably use -에서.
    노래방에서 노래를 불렀다.
    도서관에서 공부를 한다.
    방에서 담배 피지 말거라.

    If 서술어 is a verb describing an existence/status, you should probably use -에.
    그는 쥐구멍에 숨고 싶었다.
    옷에 먼지가 뭍었다.
    산에 꽃이 피었다.
     

    bkkc

    New Member
    English (US)
    Sitting is an action, though. This is very hard to understand. If it was 앉아있다 then I could see why 에 would make sense, since that describes a status.

    I'm going to take a poll of about 10 Koreans this week about this, including at least two who teach. Obviously someone is wrong here, but I showed it to someone in written form so there was no mistake, and asked them twice about that particle in particular.
     
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    Rance

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Sitting is an action, though. This is very hard to understand. If it was 앉아있다 then I could see why 에 would make sense, since that describes a status.
    Got to love irregulars, right? ;)
    Sadly that's always how rule of thumb works. One is bound to see exceptions.
    Interestingly other similar action verbs such as 서다 and 눕다, are also exclusively paired with -에.
    However 일어서다 is usually paired with -에서.

    I'm going to take a poll of about 10 Koreans this week about this, including at least two who teach. Obviously someone is wrong here, but I showed it to someone in written form so there was no mistake, and asked them twice about that particle in particular.
    Fortunately a poll won't be needed for this case.
    You can simply look up from Naver Dictionary.
    It clearly indicates 앉다 is exclusively paired with -에.
    For comparison, you can look up 일어서다 and check its different usage based on whether it's paired with -에 or -에서.
    Likewise, you can look up any other verbs of your interest to see whether they are paired with -에 or -에서.
     
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    HTKim

    New Member
    korean
    I think 'Auxilliary Verb 주다' or 주세요 is used when we want to make the sentence more polite. It doesn't matter the action would benefit or not. 앉아주세요 = sit down, please (앉으세요 = sit down, please) but 앉아주세요 sounds slightly more polite..
    일어서주세요, 가 주세요, 와 주세요, 사 주세요 만들어 주세요 There are a lot of usages you can make.
    And I think it doen't have too much serious meaning. just "please give some specific action(sit down) for me"
     
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