Avec+abstract noun

agueda

Senior Member
Korean
“Il se déplace avec difficulté; il marche avec une canne.”
Pouvez-vous m’expliquer, s’il vous plaît, pourquoi il n’y a pas l’article défini ou l’article partitif avant “difficulté”? (Comme “Avec du courage...”)
Merci beaucoup! J
 
  • RuK

    Senior Member
    English/lives France
    He moves around with difficulty. There's no 'the' difficulty. You could say 'difficilement' or I guess you could say "il se déplace avec de la difficulté".
     

    tilt

    Senior Member
    French French
    He moves around with difficulty. There's no 'the' difficulty. You could say 'difficilement' or I guess you could say "il se déplace avec de la difficulté".
    You could say 'difficilement' :tick:
    "il se déplace avec de la difficulté" :cross: This sentence seems to say he took some difficulty with him before to move! :D

    I'd never add any article after avec if the following noun is a generic or an abstract object (feelings, concepts, etc.):
    il avance avec difficulté, il attend avec patience, une voiture avec chauffeur, une chambre
    avec vue sur la mer.

    When the object is specific and/or concrete, on the contrary, an article is required:
    il marche avec une canne, il court avec le chien, du thé avec du sucre, la chambre avec la meilleure vue sur la mer.

    In some cases, nonetheless, a partitive article is used even for abstract objects: avec de la patience, avec du courage...
    These phrases would be translated in with some... in English.


    I'm afraid my explanations are not that clear...
    Other French speakers may explain better than I do. :eek:
     

    agueda

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Your explanation was more than clear, tilt! Thanks for giving me lots of examples for each case... I think I now got the whole "avec + abrastract/common noun" thing, and I appreciate your help... :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top