Avellaneda (pronunciation of "v")

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by GeriReshef, Dec 29, 2013.

  1. GeriReshef

    GeriReshef Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    We have a discussion in our Wikipedia about the correct way to transcript the name "Avellaneda" to our set of characters (we don't use the Latin alfabeth, and thus cannot just write it in the same way as in Spanish).
    The disagreement is about the "ve" in the middle: from one side I tend to use our equivalent for the letter V, but someone else insists that in Argentina V before E sounds more like a B then like a V.
    The name is surely written with a V, but do you feel you pronounce it in the same way as you pronounce B or there is no doubt it is V?
     
  2. Gamen Banned

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Hello Geri.
    You were told the truth. In Argentina we don't make differences to pronounce "v" and "b". All our "v" and "b" just sound as "b" (bilabial). That is, we don't pronounce the "v" as labiodental. But I think the same happens in the rest of the hispanic countries. Wait for their confirmation.
     
  3. Rubns

    Rubns Senior Member

    Extremadura/Spain/EU
    Español - Spanish (Spain)
    "B" and "v" are pronounced the same. But some Spanish speakers distinguish them.

    This is what the RAE says about it:

     
  4. Maximino Banned

    Santiago de Chile
    Español chileno
    Estoy de acuerdo con ambos: Gamen y Rubns.


    Saludos
     
  5. GeriReshef

    GeriReshef Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    ¡Muchisimas gracias a todos!
     
  6. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    When you transliterate, you should use the original spelling (double vov). It wouldn't look good with a bet.
    beiz, I meant 'beyz' for 'b'
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2013
  7. anipo

    anipo Senior Member

    Israel
    Spanish (Arg)- German
    De acuerdo con Duvija: doble vav.
    Y que todos me perdonen, pero yo sigo diferenciando entre la pronunciación de las dos letras. O por lo menos así me parece :rolleyes:.
    Saludos.
     
  8. GeriReshef

    GeriReshef Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    That is the problem we (the Hebrew Wikipedia) are trying to solve.
    I guess most English speakers pronounce the name Valencia as if it had an English V,
    and Spanish speakers are pronouncing English names as if they are written in Spanish;
    because the names should be written in the same way in all the languages that use Latin based alfabet,
    and that yields misunderdstandings about the correct pronunciation.

    I remember a long and angry thread in the Spanish forum about the subject how the name Mexico should be wtitten: in Argentina it is written Mejico because this is how it should be pronounced, while everywhere else it is Mexico.

    In Hebrew the tendency is to write the names in same way they are pronounced, but many times we are influenced by the English interpretations..
    As far as it concerns known names - it will be very strange to change from ו (the equivalent of the Latin V) to ב (the equivalent of the B),
    but rare names like Avellaneda - maybe should be written correctly.

    Well this discussion is not for this forum, though the problem is not typical only to Hebrew.
     
  9. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Si lo hacés, serás el único. Te mirarán con cara rara, supongo. Nos suena gracioso cuando un extranjero trata de diferenciarlas.
     
  10. GeriReshef

    GeriReshef Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    I'm just wonder: when you say Bolivia - the v is pronounced as b?
    For me it sounds very strange, but I'm not a native Spanish speaker.
     
  11. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

  12. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Both are , but different. One is word/phrase initial and the other is intervocalic, so it's an approximant, almost a fricative.
     
  13. anipo

    anipo Senior Member

    Israel
    Spanish (Arg)- German


    Así que después de todo, sí hay una diferencia (¡Viva la pequeña diferencia! :)) . Tampoco me suenan igual en envasar y embajada.

    BTW, you were right at first when you wrote bet, which is the modern Hebrew pronunciation of the letter.
    Saludos, (y que no sufras demasiado del frío).
     
  14. _SantiWR_ Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    You're getting it wrong, anipo. B and V are pronounced differently in "Bolivia" (if the word comes at the beginining of a sentence), but that's nothing to do with the spelling.
     
  15. anipo

    anipo Senior Member

    Israel
    Spanish (Arg)- German
    I am not speaking about the spelling which is obvious, but about pronunciation.
    Saludos.
     
  16. _SantiWR_ Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    Aren't you trying to make a point that v and b are pronounced differently?
     
  17. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    B and V are not pronounced differently from each other, they are pronounced differently depending on their position in a word.
     
  18. Rubns

    Rubns Senior Member

    Extremadura/Spain/EU
    Español - Spanish (Spain)
    That's true, but the difference is very subtle.

    This is the sound: "β" and it sounds like this.

    Bolivia: [boˈliβja]
    Avellaneda: [aβeʎaˈneða]
     
  19. GeriReshef

    GeriReshef Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    I feel a little confused: till some days ago I thought that though Spanish speakers tend to pronounce V the same way they pronounce B, they feel it is not the same and they are not aware to how non native Spanish speakers hear it.
    Maybe on their tongues both consonants are alike, but in their mind - not.

    In this thread I was surprise to find out that for native Spanish speakers both characters sounds the same, and this is officialy supported by the RAE.

    Now I understand from the remarks that sometimes maybe a difference.
    For example do you pronounce the same way the V of Bolivia and the B of Namibia?
    And what about the V of (tú) vienes and the B of bienes?
    The V of oveja and the B of abeja?

    Muchas gracias. :)
     
  20. Gamen Banned

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    It is the same sound of "b" in all cases.
     
  21. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Check the answer in #17. Yes, v/b are always the same. The problem is there are two sounds for each, depending on the environment, but the same two for v/b.
    In the orthography, we learn that: before 'b' the nasal is always an 'm'. What we don't learn (they don't teach us that, who knows why) is that ' before 'v' there is always an 'n'. (envío, anverso, inverso, convido, etc.). But that's the spelling. When speaking mb/nv are identical.
    When not following a nasal, it's the same story: vaca=baca, caba=cava, identical.
    I hope we were clear. Otherwise, we'll try to explain it better.
     
  22. Rubns

    Rubns Senior Member

    Extremadura/Spain/EU
    Español - Spanish (Spain)
    As an addition to duvija's explanation, the identical pronunciation of "b" and "v" in Spanish, explains why some native Spanish speakers tend to pronounce "v" as "b" in English (for example: bery instead of very).
     
  23. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Well, that's interesting. I sometimes think English speakers have an unfair advantage when it comes to Spanish spelling. Do you think it could be taught better? Surely there are other mnemonic tricks ...
     
  24. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Exactly!
     
  25. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Not really, but in this case, it wouldn't hurt. I hadn't realized it, but my (incredible great and famous) syntax professor (James McCawley) at the U of Chicago, made a point telling everybody what they don't teach us in Spanish speaking countries.
     
  26. grindios Senior Member

    USA
    English
    I disagree about position of the letter. "veinte" is always pronounced "beinte" and "velocidad" is a v, not "belocidad." What about the AVE in Spain? Never heard a Spaniard say "abe" but rather "ave"

    I think that in South America it might not be as apparent, as I knew a girl from Colombia that, in English, would say "berbs are bery hard to learn." So I think there they use the B sound for both the B and V. I could be very wrong. I think in Central America there is more distinction.

    In my opinion, they should be pronounced differently to help with the rampant misspellings that are common in Spanish. I hate the Spanish "theta" but it works to differentiate the s from the c and z.
     
  27. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    I think what you hear as a native English speaker and what they actually say might be two different things, or maybe just individual variations.
     
  28. grindios Senior Member

    USA
    English

    I'd bet more than anything it depends on the speaker. I think you hit the nail on the head there.
     
  29. Rubns

    Rubns Senior Member

    Extremadura/Spain/EU
    Español - Spanish (Spain)
    AVE = [ˈaβe]

    It's not the same sound than "v" in "velocidad".

    Velocidad is pronounced "belocidad". Listen to this.
     
  30. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    I do remember seeing somewhere that the longer Spanish speakers have lived in the U.S., the more likely they are to differentiate B and V (by an objective measure), presumably because of the influence of English.
     
  31. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Explanation in #12.
     
  32. GeriReshef

    GeriReshef Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    I think I understood it at last: there are two different sounds, but not one of B and one of V, rather - one of B/V in some circumstances, and one of B/V in other circumstances.
    Thanks again to everybody.
     
  33. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

     
  34. _SantiWR_ Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    The consonant sound in "AVE" is exactly the same as in "haba".

    Any Spanish speaker learning English could actually say something like that.
     
  35. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    I must tell you you are mistaken... :eek:
     
  36. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    It's called ' neutralization'. Phonologically, /b/ and /v/ are neutralized towards /b/. For some reason, it was decided it was neutralized towards /b/ but it could have been towards /v/, because they are the same. In phrase initial position, it's a clear phonetic stop, but and approximant in between vowels. In the IPA that b should be a b with a little horizontal line crossing it, but for some reason they use 'beta', which is more accurately the Greek sound and not the Spanish.
     
  37. jilar

    jilar Senior Member

    Galicia, España
    Español
    Me ha encantado localizar este tema, es una de mis pasiones, la diferencia entre el leguaje escrito (la escritura, signos que vemos) y el lenguaje hablado (el habla, lo que suena y oímos).

    Debemos entender que la escritura se refleja con letras y, el habla, hoy en día, se refeja con "fonemas".

    El habla evoluciona (cambia con el tiempo) mucho más rápido que la escritura, en cualquier lengua. Así, diría que cualquier "lengua natural" (el esperanto es artificial, NO TIENE EXCEPCIONES y una de sus bases es usar un signo (letra) para cada sonido(fonema), siempre, siempre y siempre) presenta EXCEPCIONES.
    Y tales excepciones siempre crearán dificultades a quienes no sean nativos, más aún cuando se emplea básicamente el mismo abecedario (latino) y, como estamos viendo, en diferentes idiomas tienen diferente sonido.

    Esto pasa en castellano (español) como en inglés.
    Por ejemplo ¿cuántos sonidos (fonemas) diferentes tiene la letra T en inglés? En español es siempre el mismo, la T de por ejemplo la palabra inglesa TOP.
    En inglés depende de la palabra.
    Si va seguida de una H (TH), unas veces suena como una D (the, this, there, ...), y otras como una Z castellana (think, theater ... notice this word both T, they have a differente sound, or not?
    Todavía hay otro sonido para la T en inglés, en palabras acabadas en "-tion" (satisfaction, action, ...) el sonido se parece más a una S que a una T.

    Y qué puedo decir de la letra C, tanto en español como inglés, y muchas otras lenguas que usan el alfabeto latino.
    Ca, Co, Cu suena como K, en ambos idiomas.
    La excepción está cuando se suma una E o una I, en la mayoría de idiomas latinos, repito.

    Concretando el tema sobre el que hablamos diría lo siguiente.
    Actualmente la mayoría de hispanohablantes (y en concreto en España) no diferencian el SONIDO ante una B y una V.
    Esto explica muchos errores de escritura (baca por vaca, cuando realmente existe la palabra Baca y tiene un significado muy diferente al animal (vaca))
    Pues la evolución del habla ha sido hacerlas iguales, esto es, el sonido B para ambas letras.
    Sí puede haber quien las diferencie (y cuando ve una B pronuncie una B, y cuando vea una V pronuncie la V - como un inglés haría), por varios motivos, el principal es que en su entorno así la pronuncien, y así haya asimilado ese concepto, pero son minoría, apuesto.

    Eso sí, como decía antes, la evolución del habla es más rápida a la escritura. ¿Por qué hoy en día diferenciamos ambas letras (escribiendo) pero no a la hora de pronunciarlas?
    Porque la escritura tiende a mantenerse como era en su origen. Y antiguamente en español sí diferenciábamos a la hora de pronunciar la V y la B.
    Que es lo más lógico, pues el castellano es un idioma que tiende a esto (hay excepciones escribiendo las palabras pero tenemos una normativa muy clara y diría que se basa en la idea del esperanto, una letra, un sonido .... repito hay excepciones, pero en español no necesitamos un código fonético para saber cómo suena una palabra, si está bien escrita y sabemos la norma la podremos pronunciar como realmente suena aunque no la hayamos oído ... esto es muy difícil en inglés, pues aunque hay tendencias claras entre la escritura y el habla, hay muchas excepciones, y por ello, el inglés sí precisa un código fonético para saber cómo suena la palabra ... de hecho en cualquier diccionario inglés veremos que a cada palabra le sigue su código sonoro o fonético)

    También veamos la H. En español, actualmente, es muda, no suena nada (nothing sounds) ... pero en su día sí había una sonorización, que era tal cual la H inglesa, o muy parecida. Según he leído la H latina (de los romanos) deducen los profesionales que era un sonido aún más fuerte que la H inglesa, podríamos decir que estaba más cerca de la J actual española.

    Y acabo. :)
    Debemos tener esto en cuenta, la escritura y el habla, y la velocidad con la que cambian.
     
  38. chutonon Member

    "Spanish - Chile"
    these too are homophones for Spanish native speakers at least in South America. I concur with Rubns about the sound: "β" but most speakers never notice such subtle difference. in Chilean spanish the same applies for the pair "CH" "SH" we can say Chileno or Shileno and the only difference is a social connotation.
     
  39. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Ningún nativo que no haya estudiado el tema se da cuenta de la diferencia que hacemos en los sonidos, dependiendo del lugar en la sílaba y de los fonemas contiguos. Se supone que son procesos automáticos por lo tanto también se supone que no tenemos que darnos cuenta (o dejan de ser automáticos).
    El español escrito se considera más fonético que el inglés. No lo es. Al menos no lo es tanto como nos quieren hacer creer.
    A los interesados les propongo una cosa: escriban todo el alfabeto y letra por letra, busquen las diferencias en palabras distintas. Resultado?: no hay ni una letra que tenga un único sonido. Créanme, los que no tienen demasiado interés. Los curiosos, háganlo y cuenten.
    (Y eso sin siquiera meternos en regionalismos. La 's' es fantástica).
     
  40. dexterciyo

    dexterciyo Senior Member

    Español - Canarias
    ¿De dónde has sacado eso? Es el bulo más difundido de la historia del español, junto con el de las mayúsculas no llevan tilde.

    Un saludo.
     
  41. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    :tick:
     
  42. jilar

    jilar Senior Member

    Galicia, España
    Español
    El tema me recordó este programa de Jesús Calleja, donde habla con José Coronado sobre el asunto. Y en concreto éste le pronuncia a modo de ejemplo la palabra "verbo".
    A Jesús Calleja le cuesta pillar el sonido o no acaba de entender el motivo de tal diferenciación, cuando él es castellano de pura cepa, por así decirlo, de Castilla y León :) donde no diferencian entre B y V.
    http://www.mitele.es/viajes/planeta-calleja/temporada-1/programa-1/

    Sobre el minuto 36:00 (el contador va hacia atrás, los minutos van descontando, a menos. Ojo al dato)

    Duvija, eso es una simple opinión personal, porque nadie te puede asegurar al 100% cómo hablaban en el pasado. Toda opinión será resultado de unas hipótesis o teorías al respecto, en base a análisis de textos (escritura) básicamente y, diría, aplicando el sentido común.
    El sonido no ha quedado grabado hasta entrado el siglo pasado. La manera de "grabar" las lenguas era sólo la forma escrita.

    ¿Cómo crees que ha perdurado en castellano la letra V si, según tú, nunca hemos diferenciado entre esa letra y la B, en cuanto a sonoridad que es de lo que hablamos?
    La RAE no ha existido siempre, que es la que hoy en día digamos evita en cierto modo que el idioma derive, cambie.

    De hecho hay palabras que sí sufrieron cambio y así se hizo por lo tanto en su escritura.
    Advocatus -> abogado (en gallego, la norma, pues hay Academia Galega, mantiene la V original latina, pero ojo, igualmente en gallego actualmente no diferenciamos V/B en su sonido)

    Pero muchas otras han permanecido (V original latina que se conserva) ... aunque hoy en día la mayoría de españoles hablan como estamos explicando, sólo emplean el fonema B.

    Y los romanos, obligatoriamente debían diferenciar entre B y V a la hora de pronunciarlas, porque si no es así no tiene sentido que para un mismo sonido crearan/usaran dos signos/letras diferentes.

    Las mayúsculas, claro que llevan tilde, pero hubo un tiempo donde se podían desechar ¿por qué? Piensa cuando se escribía a máquina. El signo de la tilde cuando escribían una mayúscula no quedaba lo suficientemente alto (separado de la letra), sino que golpeaba sobre su parte superior.
    Sería una cosa de gusto más que nada, no les parecería que quedara muy estético con la letra medio tachada por encima, muy diferente a cómo quedaban las minúsculas.

    Recuerdo debatir con mi propio hermano sobre esto, él no ponía tildes en las mayúsculas (cuando escribía manualmente), aludiendo que eso decía la norma (que se podían omitir ... cada cual decidía si le era posible). Yo siempre tildaba, pues para mí tal signo refleja la verdadera pronunciación de la palabra (y haciéndolo manualmente siempre es posible hacer la tilde y que quede por encima de la mayúscula)
     
  43. jmx

    jmx Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spain / Spanish
    Se cree que en el castellano de la edad Media sí había una diferencia de sonido entre B y V (que entonces se escribía 'U'/'V'). Una vez que se ha fijado la manera de escribir una palabra, la gente la sigue escribiendo igual por costumbre, aunque haya desaparecido la diferencia de sonido, y tanto más si se fija en diccionarios y otras obras.

    Por cierto que dicen que el sonido de V del castellano en la edad Media no era labiodental sino bilabial fricativo, frente al oclusivo de B ... no sé si creérmelo. En latín originalmente la V consonante se cree que se pronunciaba [w].

    Otra cosa, la diferencia ortográfica actual entre B y V era distinta antiguamente, por ejemplo 'haber' o 'caballo' se escribían con V/U.
     
  44. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    El problema este es más complejo para los que están estudiando castellano.

    Resulta que dentro de un mismo país habrá personas que pronuncian todas las V como B, o todas las B como V, y otros aún pronunciarán esas letras mezcladas Algunas veces como V y otras como B.

    Es cosa de que se pongan a escuchar videos en youtube. :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  45. Sakura-86

    Sakura-86 Member

    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Castellano, Argentina
    Por simple lógica se puede deducir que originalmente se diferenciaban los sonidos de las V y de las B. Si no, como dice jilar, por qué se originarían son símbolos distintos?
    Y con respecto a las mayúsculas. Hubo un tiempo que no se ponían las tildes si escribías en mayúsculas. Yo no puedo confirmar si era opcional o no, pero a mí me lo enseñaron en el colegio como que no se ponían, y después salió la noticia que volvía a ser obligatorio poner la tilde. Así que sí, en una época las mayúsculas podían ir sin tilde.
     
  46. jilar

    jilar Senior Member

    Galicia, España
    Español
    Interesará a más de uno, supongo.
    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historia_del_alfabeto_latino
    Nótese la aparición formal (oficial, pues ya había instituciones tratando de fijar unas reglas) de la U y por ejemplo la J.
    Y, cómo o por qué apareció la W. Un sonido ajeno a los romanos hasta ese momento.
    Curiosamente en castellano se llama "uve doble" (realmente se crea uniendo dos V), pero en inglés le llaman "u doble" (double U) clara muestra de que la letra V era interpretada (sonaba) más como una U que una V actual.
     
  47. _SantiWR_ Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    ¿Por el latín? En cualquier caso creo que para cuando se fijó la moderna ortografía ya no existía diferenciación entre v y b (si es que alguna vez la hubo), por tanto escribimos con b o v básicamente por motivos etimológicos.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2014
  48. sal62 Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    spanish
    It isn´t like that. We just miss to pronounce "V" very often using "B" instead. What happens is that "V" it is not so strong that should be, forming an intermediate sound, amid "V" and "B".

    Saludos.
     
  49. Sakura-86

    Sakura-86 Member

    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Castellano, Argentina
    Opino como sal62. Yo creo que la "V" mantiene un sonido intermedio, extremadamente parecido a la "B", pero no del todo igual.
     
  50. Lurrezko

    Lurrezko Senior Member

    Junto al mar
    Spanish (Spain) / Catalan
    Varón y barón suenan exactamente igual en mi pueblo. Se conoce que los académicos de la RAE y el grueso de los lingüistas son todos de mi zona.

    Un saludo
     

Share This Page

Loading...