avoid and escape with gerunds/infinitive

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Annakrutitskaya

Senior Member
Russian
Hello!

The verb 'to avoid' is always followed by gerund. Would it be correct to say that "to escape" is also always followed by gerund?

He avoided dealing with this person.
He escaped dealing with him.

Thank you!
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Another grammar discussion I shouldn't enter, but when I see a rule, I immediate begin thinking of exceptions:

    He avoided injury.
    He escaped death.


    Neither a gerund. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding.
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I suspect Anna is thinking of the possibility for the two verbs to be followed either by a TO INFINITIVE or by a GERUND.

    GS :)
     

    Annakrutitskaya

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Another grammar discussion I shouldn't enter, but when I see a rule, I immediate begin thinking of exceptions:

    He avoided injury.
    He escaped death.


    Neither a gerund. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding.
    Dear Copyright, sorry but your examples are not correct for my context - all verbs in your examples are followed by nouns, but the rule I am discussing concerns situations when a verb is followed by a verb in the form of gerund or infinitive (most likely, there are a lot of transitive verbs which can be followed only by gerunds or infinitives or both :) )
     

    Dexta

    Senior Member
    English (British and Australian)
    "all verbs in your examples are followed by nouns, but the rule I am discussing concerns situations when a verb is followed by a verb"

    Hi Anna,

    What is a gerund? Is it a verb functioning as a noun?

    "all verbs in your examples are followed by nouns"... Really?

    He avoided injuring himself.
    He escaped dying a slow and painful death.

    Gerunds, verbs or nouns?
     

    Annakrutitskaya

    Senior Member
    Russian
    "all verbs in your examples are followed by nouns, but the rule I am discussing concerns situations when a verb is followed by a verb"

    Hi Anna,

    What is a gerund? Is it a verb functioning as a noun?

    "all verbs in your examples are followed by nouns"... Really?

    He avoided injuring himself.
    He escaped dying a slow and painful death.

    Gerunds, verbs or nouns?
    Hello Dexta :) Thank you for answering. Please, take a look at the difference:
    These ones suggested by Copyright and followed by nouns: He avoided injury.
    He escaped death

    Your ones followed by gerunds: He avoided injuring himself.
    He escaped dying a slow and painful death.


    Your ones answer by question :) 'Escape' is followed by gerund :) Only?
    Thank you!
     

    0hisa2me

    Senior Member
    British English
    I would say that when 'escape' is followed by a verb, that it takes 'ing', so, for example, 'he used legal loopholes to escape paying taxes'. The only exception I can think of is when we say escape + 'in order to'. For example, 'He escaped (in order) to meet up with his wife'.
     

    Dexta

    Senior Member
    English (British and Australian)
    'Escape' is followed by gerund :) Only?

    Yes. Here is a list of common verbs followed by gerunds. :)
     

    Annakrutitskaya

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I would say that when 'escape' is followed by a verb, that it takes 'ing', so, for example, 'he used legal loopholes to escape paying taxes'. The only exception I can think of is when we say escape + 'in order to'. For example, 'He escaped (in order) to meet up with his wife'.
    Thank you very much! :)
     
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