avoir un point de côté

graig

Member
French - France
Hi everyone,

I was wondering how would you translate "avoir un point de côté" in English.

Having a "point de côté" occurs when you make a effort and you feel a pain in your belly.

Thanks,
G
 
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  • L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    [...] As Pieanne & floise pointed out "avoir un point de cote" is "to have a stitch in one's side"
    One's side being more exactly in the diaphragm, right under the floating ribs. (so not quite a pain in the tummy, graig)
     
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    floise

    Senior Member
    U.S.;English
    My old Robert and Collins gives 'point de côté' as meaning 'stitch (in one's side)'.

    [...]
    floise
     
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    Marcewa

    Senior Member
    France / French
    Hi all,

    Just to be sure: do we say to have a stitch? (avoir un point de côté) during a run for example (pain below the ribs).

    Thanks a lot.
     

    anglais428

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    oui tu as raison.... exemple: "I can't run anymore, I have a stitch'. Mais on peut aussi dire 'I was beginning to get a stitch/ i was getting a stitch from running so much.
     

    mes6

    Senior Member
    English
    I know this is old, but I wanted to say that, at least in my area, Northeast US, you would never say "I have a stitch". We use "cramp". After a mile run you might say, "Wow, I have a really bad cramp..."
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    do we say to have a stitch? (avoir un point de côté) during a run for example (pain below the ribs).
    in my area, Northeast US, you would never say "I have a stitch". We use "cramp". After a mile run you might say, "Wow, I have a really bad cramp..."
    Right, but a cramp would be "une crampe" in French, and would likely affect your leg (thigh, calf, ankle)...
    What about precisely the pain below the ribs , on the side (côté) ?
     

    mes6

    Senior Member
    English
    It's really based on context. If you're running and you say "I have a cramp", people will assume that you're talking about a pain in your ribs. If you have a cramp in your leg, to avoid ambiguity we say "I have a leg cramp."

    But if someone in bed says "I have a cramp" no such assumption would be made, and the listener would have to ask, "Where is your cramp"?
     

    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    To have a pain in the side, is not quite the same; it is less precise than a stitch, which is as described at #4.
     
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    benyalom

    Member
    English, United States
    We'd say "I have a side-ache" in California. Or "cramp".

    "To have a stitch in one's side" sounds arcane in American English at least - might be just fine in Britain.
     
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