award certificate

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marcbatco

Senior Member
Italian-Italy
Hi, I would like to please ask which of the expressions are correct in the following (if used as names of files or names in texts):
PhD Award Certificate, PhD Certificate, Master's Degree Certificate, Master's Certificate
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    • PhD Award Certificate - OK but superfluous
    • PhD Certificate - Good
    • Master's Degree Certificate - OK but superfluous
    • Master's Certificate- Good
    However, I'm not at all sure whether such certificates are actually awarded or what they're called in the British system.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    In the US, that would be a "diploma" in each case. (I would certainly not use "award" with Ph.D. in that context.)
    Than you, pob14. Therefore, you would say: PhD Diploma Certificate or PhD Certificate? And, Master's Degree Diploma Certificate? Or Master's Degree Certificate?
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    • PhD Award Certificate - OK but superfluous
    • PhD Certificate - Good
    • Master's Degree Certificate - OK but superfluous
    • Master's Certificate- Good
    However, I'm not at all sure whether such certificates are actually awarded or what they're called in the British system.
    Thank you, Keith Bradford, for your explanation.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    You're asking about omitting the periods? I wouldn't, but a quick Google search shows that Columbia's website (among many others) uses the periods, whereas the University of Chicago's (among many others) does not. I would not presume to argue with either of those fine institutions, so my conclusion is that both are correct.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    As an aside, someone who holds the diploma is called a "diplomate", a term you almost never hear in the USA. So you hear, "She's has a PhD in bacteriology" but it would be surprising to hear, "She is a PhD diplomate in bacteriology". [American English]

    Occasionally you hear "She holds a PhD in ..." which I don't think is wrong but it always seems a little strange to me.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    You're asking about omitting the periods? I wouldn't, but a quick Google search shows that Columbia's website (among many others) uses the periods, whereas the University of Chicago's (among many others) does not. I would not presume to argue with either of those fine institutions, so my conclusion is that both are correct.
    As an aside, someone who holds the diploma is called a "diplomate", a term you almost never hear in the USA. So you hear, "She's has a PhD in bacteriology" but it would be surprising to hear, "She is a PhD diplomate in bacteriology". [American English]

    Occasionally you hear "She holds a PhD in ..." which I don't think is wrong but it always seems a little strange to me.
    Thank you, pob14 and Packard, for your precious advice.
     
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