away from/in/one step away from

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I wonder if I'm correct at using these preposition.

微信图片_20220514134801.png

a) Leicester City is away from relegation zone.
b) Burnley is one stey away from relegation zone.
c) Wartford is in relegation zone.


Much appreciated!
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Zone" is countable, so it needs an article. In this case, you are talking about one particular relegation zone, so use "the".

    Apart from that, (b) and (c) are fine apart from the spelling mistakes ("step" and "Watford"). In (a), use "out of" rather than "in". When I read "Leicester City is away...", I expected to then read something like "...to Watford on Sunday".

    Also, it is rare to use singular verb forms for football teams (or any other type of team) in ordinary BrE. Use "are".
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Do I understand your comments correctly, Uncle Jack.

    Thank you so mcuh for your detailed reply.

    "Zone" is countable, so it needs an article. In this case, you are talking about one particular relegation zone, so use "the".

    Apart from that, (b) and (c) are fine apart from the spelling mistakes ("step" and "Watford"). In (a), use "out of" rather than "in". When I read "Leicester City is away...", I expected to then read something like "...to Watford on Sunday".

    Also, it is rare to use singular verb forms for football teams (or any other type of team) in ordinary BrE. Use "are".
    a) Leicester City are out of the relegation zone.
    b) Burnley are one step away from the relegation zone.
    c) Watford are in the relegation zone.


    I noticed that there isn't an "in" in (a), so I guess probably you meant "away from". Anyway, if they're okay now. Please "Agree" me. :D
     

    rotan

    Senior Member
    Polish
    In (a), use "out of" rather than "in". When I read "Leicester City is away...", I expected to then read something like "...to Watford on Sunday".
    Wait, actually?
    I always thought that "out of" would only sound fine if I was saying that directly after the game which helped them leave
    "Leicester City are out of the relegation zone thanks to a 4-1 win over Southampton on Saturday."
    "Leicester City are out of the relegation zone." sounds weird to me for some reason when it comes to just stating a general fact... I would probably follow the Watford scheme and say "Leicester City are not in the relegation zone."

    The difference I see here is similar to saying:
    "Man United are out of the Champions League."
    "Man United are not in the Champions League."
    ... with the first sentence meaning they were eliminated during the competition, and with the second sentence meaning they didn't qualify and don't participate at all

    Do you sir mind explaining? 🙃
     
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    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I noticed that there isn't an "in" in (a), so I guess probably you meant "away from". Anyway, if they're okay now. Please "Agree" me. :D
    Yes, sorry.
    Wait, actually?
    I always thought that "out of" would only sound fine if I was saying that directly after the game which helped them leave
    "Leicester City are out of the relegation zone thanks to a 4-1 win over Southampton on Saturday."
    "Leicester City are out of the relegation zone." sounds weird to me for some reason when it comes to just stating a general fact... I would probably follow the Watford scheme and say "Leicester City are not in the relegation zone."

    The difference I see here is similar to saying:
    "Man United are out of the Champions League."
    "Man United are not in the Champions League."
    ... with the first sentence meaning they were eliminated during the competition, and with the second sentence meaning they didn't qualify and don't participate at all

    Do you sir mind explaining? 🙃
    The situations are different. The relegation zone is always there. Teams can move in and out of the relegation zone all season; Burnley, Everton and Southampton are out of the relegation zone at the moment, but they might still end up getting relegated, and Leeds, who are in the relegation zone, might not get relegated. We do talk about teams moving out of the relegation zone, but they might drop back into it later on, and you need an action verb if you want to describe this movement out.

    With the Champions League, once you are out, you are out. There is no way back in. Therefore "out" refers only to being eliminated from the competition, and it can be used with "be". There is only one possible movement, after all.
    Yes, you are right. "Step" implies one match, rather than one position. However, I did not see "step" as wrong, so perhaps it is used.
     

    rotan

    Senior Member
    Polish
    The situations are different. The relegation zone is always there. Teams can move in and out of the relegation zone all season; Burnley, Everton and Southampton are out of the relegation zone at the moment, but they might still end up getting relegated, and Leeds, who are in the relegation zone, might not get relegated. We do talk about teams moving out of the relegation zone, but they might drop back into it later on, and you need an action verb if you want to describe this movement out.

    With the Champions League, once you are out, you are out. There is no way back in. Therefore "out" refers only to being eliminated from the competition, and it can be used with "be". There is only one possible movement, after all.
    But my logic is more like you can't be out of somewhere you've never been in, can you?
    Considering both the context where Leicester hasn't been in the Prem's relegation zone for ages, and no context, where we only look at the table provided by @Silver, I still feel it should be the way @Rover_KE says
     

    rotan

    Senior Member
    Polish
    What is the relegation zone?
    In the Premier League's case it's the lowest 3 standings in the league table, which drop you one division lower if you don't leave the zone by the end of the season (38 games)
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    What is the relegation zone?
    According to #7 posted by Uncle Jack, The Relegation Zone works only for Premier League teams. There are 20 teams in the League and they compete each other (38 games) for the whole year. The first four teams will win the chance to the European Cup and the last three teams will go to the Champions League. Champions League is not as fierce and competitive as the Premier League, which players themselves are highly competent and therefore with much more higher "price" (how much they are sold). The last three teams (as in the OP) are 18, 19 and 20. Two of them will definitely go to Champions League while No.18 will have a "qualifier" (additional game) with the champion from Champions League.

    Some famous players in Premier League are Ronaldo, Erling Haaland, and Kevin De Bruyne.

    Sorry, I wrote the above myself based on my understanding of the game, there are many mistakes but I hope this helps. Also, I know that in the US, there are many football clubs and they belong to Major Soccer League. (Not sure if the name is correct.) But it seems that there isn't a delegation zone in that League.

    Added: A quick look on the Premier League Table online, I might be wrong. I think the first two teams from the Champions League will compete for one place in the Premier League. They'll play two games and see who's the winner.
     
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    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    According to #7 posted by Uncle Jack, The Relegation Zone works only for Premier League teams.
    No. Each division in European football (except the very lowest amateur leagues) has a relegation zone. In this post you are talking about the Premier League relegation zone, hence the need for "the". All divisions apart from the top one in each country also have a promotion zone. Different methods are used for relegation and promotion. The Premier League relegation zone is automatic - the teams in the bottom three positions at the end of the season will be relegated - but in other situations there may be play-offs, or a combination of automatic promotion/relegation and play-offs.

    Promotion and relegation zones are very important to fans, and the absence of a relegation zone in the proposed European Super League is why it received such hostile opposition when it was announced.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    No. Each division in European football (except the very lowest amateur leagues) has a relegation zone. In this post you are talking about the Premier League relegation zone, hence the need for "the". All divisions apart from the top one in each country also have a promotion zone. Different methods are used for relegation and promotion. The Premier League relegation zone is automatic - the teams in the bottom three positions at the end of the season will be relegated - but in other situations there may be play-offs, or a combination of automatic promotion/relegation and play-offs.

    Promotion and relegation zones are very important to fans, and the absence of a relegation zone in the proposed European Super League is why it received such hostile opposition when it was announced.
    Thank you very much for your detailed explanation, Uncle Jack.

    Thank you very much for pointing out my mistakes, rotan. I mistook "Champions League" for "Championship". And yes, there are many others football games BELOW the Championship.
     

    rotan

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Anytime
    There's a thread 'Football' in Culture Cafe - if you have any purely football-related questions, go there... just so that we don't end up totally 'off-toping' this one 😀 (no, that's not a promotion of my thread 😅)
     
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