awkeotsang/ jelly fig ice

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  • Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    For foods that are not habitually eaten in English-speaking countries, we generally use some version of the original name (adapted to English-speaking tongues).
     

    arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    Thanks, Nunty.

    So, awkeotsang ice as well as jelly fig ice sound good to you.
    I wonder if there are people here who have tasted it before and can tell us what it is called!
     

    Majorbloodnock

    Senior Member
    British English
    Awkeotsang is a cultivar of the Creeping Fig (Ficus Pumila). The fruit, according to Wikipedia, is used to make "ice jelly", and the jelly is then combined with sweeteners and lemon or lime juice to produce the delicacy Arueng is talking about. My guess is that we'd simply change the word order and call it "fig ice jelly", but it's no more than a guess.

    Here's the link to the food in question.
     
    Last edited:

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    The Wiki article calls it "aiyu jelly" and if you Google this term you will find quite a large number of sites in English which use it. I think this is the best term to use, rather than trying to make up an English term yourself. As Nunty says, delicacies, foods and dishes from other countries for which there is no word in English are generally known by their native term (although it may be Anglicized). Sometimes they are given English names particularly when they are commercially "marketed" in order to introduce them to English speaking consumers. I think carambola is a good example of this ("star fruit"), as is "kiwi fruit" (I don't think its native names were ever used by English speakers).
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I'd say it rather depends who you're talking to, Arueng. If you asked me
    Would you like an aiyu jelly (or an awkeotsang), Ewie?
    I wouldn't have a clue what you meant.
    Whereas if you asked me
    Would you like an iced fig jelly, Ewie? We call it awkeotsang
    I would:)
     

    arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    Awkeotsang is a cultivar of the Creeping Fig (Ficus Pumila). The fruit, according to Wikipedia, is used to make "ice jelly", and the jelly is then combined with sweeteners and lemon or lime juice to produce the delicacy Arueng is talking about. My guess is that we'd simply change the word order and call it "fig ice jelly", but it's no more than a guess.

    Here's the link to the food in question.
    Thanks, Major, for the suggestion and the link.
    I like the English name--fig ice jelly--it's crystal clear and very Anglicized!

    The Wiki article calls it "aiyu jelly" and if you Google this term you will find quite a large number of sites in English which use it. I think this is the best term to use, rather than trying to make up an English term yourself. As Nunty says, delicacies, foods and dishes from other countries for which there is no word in English are generally known by their native term (although it may be Anglicized). Sometimes they are given English names particularly when they are commercially "marketed" in order to introduce them to English speaking consumers. I think carambola is a good example of this ("star fruit"), as is "kiwi fruit" (I don't think its native names were ever used by English speakers).
    Thanks, MM, for your reply and research.
    Here we do call it "aiyu jelly," but I'm afraid that most native speakers will be all at sea when hearing this term.
    Aiyu is equal to awkeotsang, I guess.

    I'd say it rather depends who you're talking to, Arueng. If you asked me
    Would you like an aiyu jelly (or an awkeotsang), Ewie?
    I wouldn't have a clue what you meant.
    Whereas if you asked me
    Would you like an iced fig jelly, Ewie? We call it awkeotsang
    I would:)
    Thanks, ewie, for the words you took right out of my mouth.

    Besides, your version "iced fig jelly" seems clearer per se than Major's. I had thought of this when I replied Major's post!
     
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