Bácula (arma de fuego)

Xio8a

Member
Español
¡Hola a tod@s todos!
Estoy buscando la traducción de la palabra "bácula" que en Los Andes es un tipo de escopeta que usan en el campo, cuando salen de cacería o para defenderse.
Gracias de antemano.

El símbolo "@" no es una letra válida del alfabeto. Muchas gracias. Ayutuxtepeque (Moderador).
 
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  • Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    Surely from Latin "băcŭlus" = stick, scepter, staff

    the same word (báculu) survives in Sardinian meaning "walking stick, cane"
     

    Xio8a

    Member
    Español
    Surely from Latin "băcŭlus" = stick, scepter, staff

    the same word (báculu) survives in Sardinian meaning "walking stick, cane"
    Creo que mantendre el significado anterior porque se parece más a la descripción que necesito. Muchas gracias por la sugerencia!
     

    ChemaSaltasebes

    Senior Member
    Castellano (España)
    Surely from Latin "băcŭlus" = stick, scepter, staff

    the same word (báculu) survives in Sardinian meaning "walking stick, cane"
    Interesting; in Spanish we also have "báculo", with the same meaning of "walking stick". And you are most probably right about the origin of "bácula", although I suspect it might be related with "báscula"; "escopeta de báscula".
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    Perhaps the ancient peoples of the Andes when they started to speak Spanish they named it báculo = stick; because they thought it was some sort of magical stick, like in the same way the north American natives named "Thundering Stick" the rifles used by white colonists, because to their primitive culture it was some sort of magical weapon.
     

    ChemaSaltasebes

    Senior Member
    Castellano (España)
    That is a great and appealing historiographic etymology, and as already mentioned it is most probably right. My own suspicion is based on the weird use of the feminine "bácula"; it would be perfectly alright were it to be named "báculo". But it isn't. Which makes me wonder if "bácula" could be just a degeneration of "escopeta de báscula" >> "báscula", pronounced "bá(h)cula", from where "bácula". Just guessing though. And I must confess I like much better your thunder stick story :)
     

    Raposu

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Just an etymological note: baculum in Latin is a short rod or stick. The os baculum is the anatomical terms for the penis bone in many mammals (including dogs, cats, bears raccoons and otters). What kind of shotgun is an escopeta de báscula? One that breaks to reload?
     

    ChemaSaltasebes

    Senior Member
    Castellano (España)
    One that breaks to reload?
    Yeap; superpuestas, paralelas o yuxtapuestas, monotiro... but it seems like break-action shotgun does not ring a bell; do those have a generic name? The Spanish "escopeta de/con báscula" is just a descriptor but it is not really a common name...
     

    Raposu

    Senior Member
    English USA
    The classic double barrel shotgun has two barrels side my side. The barrels fold down (break)from the stock to load and remove shells (ammunition).
     

    Xio8a

    Member
    Español
    Por lo que he leído una bácula es una escopeta, que probablemente se corresponda con una break-action shotgun.
    Yo realmente no se casi nada de armas, no sabría decir exactamente como funcionan pero tome la descripción anterior, porque consideró que es parecida a un escopeta, sólo que la gente de campo (campesinos) les da ese nombre, supongo que para usar una terminología criolla :rolleyes:
     
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