Bénéficier d'une rente de situation

Jinnifah

Senior Member
Canada, English
Hello!

I'm having difficulty finding an English equivalent to this expression, and it doesn't help that I don't understand it too well either. I gather from reading previous threads that it refers to benefiting from being paid for not having to work (??). But I can't seem to come up with a consice English term (if one even exists),

maybe "getting paid without working"

This is the original sentence:
"Le départ à la retraite s'agit de bénéficier d'une rente de situation, d'une rémunération légale bien méritée"

Any ideas?
Thanks in advance
 
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  • mcb_34

    Senior Member
    French, France
    rente de situation => a guaranteed (secure) income.

    Et la phrase n'est pas très correcte en français =>le départ à la retraite permet de bénéficier...
     

    funthing2do

    New Member
    french
    how did you end up translating this sentence? I still can't find an solid English equivalent for "rente de situation".
     

    bh7

    Senior Member
    Canada; English
    It is a technical term of economics. For a French explanation see here. The English equivalent is "[economic] rent" (q.v. via Google). It is actually a stretch to use the term for government-promised retirement income, which is earned and permanent and not a fortuitous and temporary extra income arising from a market imbalance. If it's "une rémunération légale bien méritée", then it really is not economic rent but previously deferred employment income the right to which was earned each year of employment.

    [A guaranteed income is a government transfer to members of a particular group in the population where the amount paid to individual members of the group is related to the total income of that person. A government transfer to members of a particular group in the population where each person receives an equal amount unrelated to any economic variable (such as income or economic need) is a demogrant.]
     

    funthing2do

    New Member
    french
    I am sorry, I don't want to be pecky here but it doesnt fit with my understanding of it! here are my definition of a Rente de situation in French:

    Avantage, privilège dont le bénéficiaire profite depuis longtemps et qu'il finit par considérer comme un droit acquis. L'occupant d'un logement neuf (...) paye un coût d'occupation trois ou quatre fois supérieur à celui qui s'impute sur les revenus des habitants des logements anciens bénéficiant d'une rente de situation

    ATILF

    or

    Rente de situation : avantage acquis depuis longtemps, que le bénéficiaire, de ce fait, considère comme un droit irréversible. Grand Robert Electronique


    There must be an expression or a work in English that mean just that! So far, though it comes so close in both thread, I haven't found that!


    Thanks for your patience with me!







     

    bh7

    Senior Member
    Canada; English
    Rente de situation : avantage acquis depuis longtemps, que le bénéficiaire, de ce fait, considère comme un droit irréversible. Grand Robert Electronique
    This view of "rente de situation" is not incompatible with that of economists. To the contrary, it is a special case of economic rent (as in fact the WIKIPEDIA article that I referred to in my earlier post points out). Accountants call such an advantage "developed goodwill" or, if paid for, "purchased goodwill". In principle, such acquired rights have value if the holder of the right can look forward to a future stream of extra income flowing from the right. That value is the present value (discounted value) of the stream of future additional income derived from the right.

    Be that as it may, your sentence suffers from poor wording and an inaccurate use of the term "rente de situation", which makes its translation into another language problematic. My suggestion would be to rephrase the sentence by dropping the misused term "rente de situation" altogether; it just does not fit the context.

    "Le départ à la retraite permet de bénéficier d'une rémunération légale bien méritée."

    In this form the sentence may be trite, but at least it would make sense, and its translation would pose no special problems.

    "Retirement means being able legally to enjoy a well-earned stream of income."
    or "Retirement means being able to enjoy a well-earned statutory stream of income."

    And I think, no violence would be done to the author's intended meaning by this bit of surgery.
     

    Chimel

    Senior Member
    Français
    This view of "rente de situation" is not incompatible with that of economists. To the contrary, it is a special case of economic rent (as in fact the WIKIPEDIA article that I referred to in my earlier post points out). Accountants call such an advantage "developed goodwill" or, if paid for, "purchased goodwill". In principle, such acquired rights have value if the holder of the right can look forward to a future stream of extra income flowing from the right. That value is the present value (discounted value) of the stream of future additional income derived from the right.
    This is the first and "technical" meaning of the expression. But in everyday French, it is often used in a broader and usually negative meaning.

    For instance, you can say of a politician that "il bénéficie d'une rente de situation" when he is candidate in a district where his party is traditionally very strong, so he hardly has to campaign, he is sure to be re-elected every time (actually, thanks to the work of his predecessors).

    In this meaning, I wonder if the translation couldn'd be "vested right" (droit acquis).
     
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    funthing2do

    New Member
    french
    Thank you both!

    First, I wish I could change the French sentence but this is one of those case where you have to deal with it since it is an assignment. I must admit that there is many places is this OT where I would perform a little syntax surgery ;-)))

    That being said, I am still juggling between meanings but I have been investigating vesting rights yesterday, as the definition is really close of the ones I have in French for Rente de situation.
    As you have figured,I have to justify my choice with solid resources and unfortunately, wikipedia isn't accepted as a reliable one!

    Again, Thank you so much! That helped! If you have any other idea, don,t hesitate!
     

    bh7

    Senior Member
    Canada; English
    Synonyms or near-synonyms of "vested right" : vested interest, vested claim, accrued right/interest, acquired right/interest, vested/accrued entitlement
     

    viacarteria

    New Member
    English UK
    Joining the conversation some 5 months late, I would just like to throw in my two cents' worth. I found the term used colloquially in the following text:

    "Hélas pour les constructeurs américains, ils ont toujours été de piètres exportateurs! Se croyant assis sur une rente de situation, GM, Ford et Chrysler ont fabriqué pendant des décennies des modèles adaptés à la configuration de leur pays."

    It had been translated as follows:

    "Sadly for the American manufacturers, they were always poor exporters! Thinking they had a licence to print money, for decades GM, Ford and Chrysler only made models suited to the specific scenario of their own country"

    Best wishes to all.
     
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