back up into a neck-breaker

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
A commentator comments on a fight between robots in a ring. Several smaller robots on a big one:
-- Oh, no! [a small robot picks a chair and hits the big one on the head] He's got a steel chair! [the big one falls to the floor] Ouch! Ho-ho! [then the big one gets up, grabs the robots and cracks them] But he's back up into a neck-breaker. He's up to the top rope.
Robots, animation

"Back" means "return to the standing position", and "up" means "getting up" from the floor. Is that right? Thank you.
 
  • Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You've certainly got the right idea. I would read it slightly differently as:
    "Back" = "returned to"
    "up" = "an upright position" [i.e. standing]

    [Cross-posted]
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "Back" means "return to the standing position", and "up" means "getting up" from the floor. Is that right? :thumbsup:

    Back (adv.) -> in/into the original position. -> "Put the book back on[to] the shelf."
    up (adv./adj.) -> upright; vertical; to a risen position, etc -> "He fell down but soon got up."
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    To me back = (as per WR definition) at or toward the original starting point, place, or condition:to go back to the old neighborhood.
    and up = upright (standing) So, he's standing again.
    cross-posted
     
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