Back used as synonym to butt or buttocks

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Lotsalatte

New Member
English (US)
I'm wondering if the word back as in backside of a human body, can sometimes be used as a synonym to the word butt or buttocks in British English? Never heard of it before I encountered it in an online synonym dictionary. If so, how common is it, is it related to any certain region, age group etc?
 
  • Cambridge has 'backside' as buttocks, so there is no difference, here, with BE and AE.


    backside
    noun [ C ]
    informal

    UK

    /ˈbæk.saɪd/ US

    /ˈbæk.saɪd/

    backside noun [C] (BODY)
    the part of the body that you sit on:
    After cycling for the whole day, my backside was very sore.
    Synonym

    BACKSIDE | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

    ==

    **NOTE: For "Back" on its own, Cambridge has NO entry for a 'butt' definition:**

    back noun [C] (BODY PART)
    A2
    the part of your body that is opposite to the front, from your shoulders to your bottom:

    I have a bad back.
    Sleeping on a bed that is too soft can be bad for your back.
    He lay on his back, staring at the ceiling.
    I turned my back (= turned around so that I could not see) while she dressed.
    She put her back out (= caused a serious injury to her back) lifting a box.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    As a BE speaker, I will agree to both points:no it's not used that way and there's no difference between AE and BE. Which online synonym source lists it as such?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Yes. But I have no idea whether that word was in widespread use anywhere in the country. It definitely occurred in Sir Mix a Lot's tune, however.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    About the only use of back for backside that I have encountered occurred in the tune Baby Got Back.
    Yes. But I have no idea whether that word was in widespread use anywhere in the country.
    Not that I’m an expert in this type of speech, but as far as I know, it’s only used in the phrase “got back,” meaning “has a pleasingly large butt.” “Back” is not, as far as I know, ever used alone to mean “butt.”[/i]
     
    Lyrics at

    Sir Mix-A-Lot - Baby Got Back Lyrics | AZLyrics.com

    Final lines:

    So ladies, if the butt is round, and you want a triple X throw down,
    Dial 1-900-MIXALOT and kick them nasty thoughts
    Baby got back! Baby got back!

    (
    Little in the middle but she got much back) [4x]
    ===


    Throughout the song, the preferred term is 'butt'. Arguably 'back' is an adverb; see the last line.

    =She got much in back OR She's got much back there.

    In short, the song never talks about 'her back', which one might expect if the 'back' meant 'butt'.
     
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    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Although at least half the definitions in the Urban Dictionary seem to have been written by Beavis and Butthead, I thought I would take a look at what it had to say about this use of back. Alex A and an anonymous contributor also believe that it is a noun that refers to a large butt.:rolleyes:

    The only reference offered was another reference to Sir Mix A Lot's song. That doesn't exactly inspire confidence in the belief that the word had any great currency back in 1992 when Baby Got Back achieved some popularity.
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I often learn a lot of interesting things here, but then there are the times I have to purify my mind from the dross, like when we defragged PCs. Exposure to Sir Mix a Lot comes into that category. Why even mention him? Like all pop songs it's hardly a guide to good even normal usage. The question is about BE

    can sometimes be used as a synonym to the word butt or buttocks in British English?
     
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