backslash, reverse slash [ \ ]

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by James Brandon, Aug 29, 2006.

  1. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    The symbol that is the opposite of a slash (or /) or stroke, in French, to my knowledge, is referred to as 'anti-slash', on the basis of the English word 'slash'. The symbol is: \

    However, 'anti-slash' is not, to the best of my knowledge, used in English; I believe the English term is 'reverse slash'.

    Can you confirm the above is correct?

    Thanks
     
  2. jann

    jann co-mod'

    English - USA
    In AE, we often say "back slash" or "forward slash" if we need to distinguish between the two.
     
  3. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    anti-slash n'est pas dans Le Petit Robert 2007
     
  4. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
  5. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    OK, that's quite possible - what would you say in French then? I have heard 'forward slash' a million times but not 'backward slash'!...
     
  6. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    En français, j'ai toujours entendu utiliser l'antislash (il ne devrait pas y avoir de tiret, logiquement).
     
  7. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
  8. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Jamais entendu, Kelly ! :)
    En revanche, barre oblique (pour slash) est très courant en France.
     
  9. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    Ok, very interesting - so in French it would indeed be 'antislash' without a hyphen; 'barre oblique inverse' is officialese I think, i.e. a pseudo-French word some official dreamt up not to use an (ugly) 'Anglo-Saxon' word! I did not know 'barre oblique' for 'slash' is used in French...

    And 'reverse slash' would be the English term, presumably.
     
  10. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    C'est ce que j'utilise.

    Tiré du Petit Robert:
     
  11. RuK Senior Member

    Outside Paris
    English/lives France
    Like Jann, I use "back slash"
     
  12. KaRiNe_Fr

    KaRiNe_Fr Senior Member

    France, Provence
    Français, French - France
    J'utilise indifféremment "anti slash" (je ne sais comment l'écrire, je le dis seulement. A l'écrit c'est \ ) ou "back slash".
    A ma grande honte, je dis aussi "anti quote" pour ceci : ` .
     
  13. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    OK, so we would have:-

    -In French: Barre oblique or slash
    -In English: Slash or stroke or forward slash

    And the opposite:

    -In French: Barre oblique inverse or antislash
    -In English: Reverse slash, or Backward slash, or Back slash

    I don't think 'slash' for 'barre oblique' is used in French... [Edit: Apparently, yes it is...]
     
  14. KaRiNe_Fr

    KaRiNe_Fr Senior Member

    France, Provence
    Français, French - France
    But, yes, it is. And much more often than "barre oblique" I think...
     
  15. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    Karine,
    OK, I have amended my previous entry then
     
  16. Bostonien Senior Member

    USA - English
    Yes, you don't seriously think that people use "barre oblique" and "barre oblique inverse" when talking about computer path names, do you? Well I can tell you that they don't, otherwise you'd hear sentences like these:

    (Linux)
    Ok, va chercher dans barre oblique home barre oblique usr barre oblique tmp barre oblique partoche et tu trouveras ton fichier

    (ou mieux encore, Windows)
    Ok, va chercher dans C deux-points barre oblique inverse Windows barre oblique inverse System32 barre oblique inverse drivers barre oblique inverse etc pour trouver ton fichier "hosts"
     
  17. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    When I summed up, I did not imply that 'barre oblique' or 'barre oblique inverse' are widely used; what I meant was that they are recognised terms for 'slash' and 'reverse slash'. I did not know those terms and it is useful for me to know that they exist and may be used. If you read the whole Thread, you will see that some French-speakers did say that they do use those terms, in fact...
     
  18. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    Ou encore
    Oublie les obliques et les slaches et utilise la fonction "Recherche"
     
  19. motoxxx138 New Member

    English - United States
    I stumbled on this thread from an accidental google search of "\" or "back slash". I thought it was very interesting and now I have to give my 2 cents (yes, 11 years later). Anyways I live in America, was born and raised here and I have not heard anything other than forward slash, front slash and back slash used in reference to a "slash". In fact I had no idea it was referred to as anything different until reading this thread right now. Especially antislash. Which I think is interesting, because basically you are saying "not a slash" or "opposite of slash". Whereas in America we are just calling it what it is. A slash that goes from left down to the right. Therefore it is a backwards leaning "slash" as oppose to "front slash" which is forward leaning? Maybe that is a strange way to think about it, but I thought "antislash" was a very amusing way of referring to it. Might as well say "not a slash"; but then I would say, "What is it then?". lol Maybe "anti" can be used as an adjective or noun too, I don't know, I think of it as a verb.
     
  20. misterk Moderator

    Boston
    English-American
    Welcome to the Forum, motoxxx138!

    My impression, from reading the preceding posts, is that "antislash" is one of the terms that is used in French. I don't think anyone was proposing that the word is used in the US.
     
  21. admiralnlson

    admiralnlson Member

    French - Metropolitan
    To people who don't speak English, I would probably say "anti-slash".
    But to my English-speaking French colleagues, I would say "backslash" because that's shorter.

    And this is very likely why almost no one will use "Barre oblique (inverse)" in normal speech.

    Academicians feel obliged to translate every single word/expression which has a non-French root into something based on French words only.
    But obviously, when the French equivalent is longer than the English version, laziness (+ defiance of authority (here, the Academy) :)) will usually win.

    And this is also what can lead us to even use "fake" English expressions like 'anti-slash' or "un parking" (= a car park), because they just roll off the tongue.
     
  22. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    I believe 'antislash' is used in French, not in English. (I must admit I haven't re-read the entire -- vintage -- Thread.) 'Anti' in apposition in English can have the meaning of 'the opposite of' (e.g.: an anti-Communist leader); it can also have the meaning of 'the reverse of' (e.g.: anticlockwise does not mean that you are against clocks or the ways of the clocks!).
     
  23. motoxxx138 New Member

    English - United States
    Yep, exactly James, I most definitely wasn't implying antislash is used in the United States, I just thought it was interesting the way the word is made up, like James was saying. Although I think counter-clockwise is the only way I have ever heard that one. James did make me realize that I overlooked the fact that just because anti means opposite doesn't mean that's how it is interpreted in French. BTW, I'm sure it's obviously, but I do not know a single word of French.
     
  24. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    'Anticlockwise' is used in British English, and is nothing unusual. But it is true there would not be many words like this. I have checked the Oxford Concise Dictionary and virtually all the words starting with 'anti--' mean 'an opponent of'. In the case of Antipodes, the etymology would be 'feet [pode] apart [anti]', so, once more, you find the idea of contrast/opposition.

    I would say that, in French, as far as I am aware, 'anti--' also means 'the opposite of', as in 'an opponent of', just like it does in English, generally speaking. E.g.: an anti-capitalist programme.
     

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