bag / package of potato chips

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  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Hi everyone. Do I call that "a package of potato chips" or "a bag of potato chips"?
    Either is correct. A package can take any form—bag, box, etc. This happens to be a bag. So you can use whichever word you like.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Crisps in BrE, too. (Our chips are what Americans call "french fries", or just "fries").

    I can't imagine ever saying "I've just eaten a package of crisps". For me it would be "a bag of crisps".

    Ws
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    In a business setting you might say package. Informally it would be bag. However, as Parla points out, package is the general term. It would also be the choice for a verb. "I just bought a bag of potato chips. Look, it was packaged in my home town of Boise!"
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I say both: "a bag/package of chips/crisps". I fail to see any difference.

    I don't say "crisps", personally, but was including it for AuE and BrE.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I never say package for something I am buying in a shop for immediate consumption. I might get a packet of crisps, biscuits, etc but never a package of crisps.

    A package, to me, implies something with other wrapping outside the product, like an item that comes throught the post.
    It seems yet another BE/AE difference
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    You wouldn't even buy a package of (dark) chocolate-covered almonds?

    You are missing out. I'll mail some to you in a package. :)
    Most kind, but it is not about "what I would buy", it is about what I would call a product in that context.
    Nuts are like crisps, whatever their coating they are sold in bags.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I might get a packet of crisps, biscuits, etc but never a package of crisps.
    Good point, suzi. 'Packet of crisps' works for me too, as an alternative to 'bag of crisps', and 'packet' would probably be my preferred term for peanuts, pork scratchings and the like (at least for the small packets they sell in pubs).

    Ws
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Okay. That's fair. We buy things in both bags and packages in the USA.
    Sorry, as another resident of the USA, I disagree. I don't buy things in packages, for the most part. I buy them in bags, boxes, cans, bottles, bars, packets, canisters, cartons... but not packages. I get a package in the mail.

    "Package" is the generic term but not the word I use in everyday life for consumables.

    I wonder if this is another regionalism, perpend, or maybe just a perpendism. ;)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I might just, perhaps, under severe duress, call this a bag of crisps.
    But in all practical contexts it is a packet of crisps.

    I noted the pack size. It's 42.5g. That's an individual portion. That is a packet of crisps.
    If it had been something bigger, for example, one of the 150g versions currently whispering 'Eat me,' from the cupboard behind me, it would not be a packet, it would be a bag.

    Under no circumstances would it be a package of crisps!
     
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