bagsy / bags [verb]

meijin

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, I've got a book about British English written by a British author and translated into Japanese, and it shows "bagsy" and "bags" as a verb to mean something like "to claim that you were the first", and gives the following example sentence.

I bagsy the seat in front of the TV.

None of the English-English dictionaries I use (including WR dictionary) has this word "bagsy", while two of the English-Japanese dictionaries I use have it, not as a verb, though, saying that it means something like "(I was the first one to get it, so) It's mine!" (the word seems to have originated from "Bags I!").

Do you BE speakers use "bagsy" or "bags" as a verb like the example above?
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Do you BE speakers use "bagsy" or "bags" as a verb like the example above?
    Children do. Adults would only use it humorously.

    It is spoken English only.

    Colloquially, the "-y" imparts a endearing nuance to the word it suffixes.
     

    DonnyB

    Member Emeritus
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I've only ever seen it in the form "Bags I", although kids (particularly young ones) do commonly use a -y suffix in the way Paul describes.

    I was going to say I had no idea how you would conjugate it, but Urban Dictionary I spotted suggests "bagsed" for the simple past. :)
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    Thinking back to my own childhood, meijin, I would have used "bagsied" as the past tense, as you suggested (maybe different in different areas of the UK?). And to confirm what PaulQ said, it's reasonably common with children, but an adult would use it rarely and generally to sound funny or childlike, rather than in earnest.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Are their past tenses "bagsied" and "bagsed"?
    66% - bagged/bagsied/bagsed

    The verb to bag is conjugated:
    I bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    you bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    He bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    We bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    you bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    They bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses

    He bagged/bagsied/bagsed
    He has bagged/bagsied/bagsed

    Bagging/bagsying/bagsing

    Imperative: Bag/bags/bagsy

    Subjunctive: bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    My belated thanks for the replies, both... (strangely, whether I search the forum with "bagsy" or "bags", this thread doesn't appear in the search results...)

    66% - bagged/bagsied/bagsed

    The verb to bag is conjugated:
    I bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    you bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    He bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    We bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    you bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    They bags/bag/bagsy/bagsies/bagses
    Hmm...I'm not sure what this means, Paul. The conjugation looks all the same regardless of pronoun...
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Yes, it is. All the versions of "bag" are possible. The verb is primarily a colloquialism and extremely informal verging on slang - it should be seen as an idiom in current use mainly by children between, say, 6 and 12 (and imitatively by adults for humour).

    The verb's third person 's' that added to the other pronouns is not uncommon in certain socioiolects, particularly (but not only) in the present historic in excited speech.

    "He threw a stone at us so we jumps over the fence and I says to him "What you think you're doin'?" and, before he answers, you hits him."
     
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