bake/roast/cook

learning_grenglish

Senior Member
India
From a source :

Bake - to cook in an oven without oil/fat
Roast - to cook in an oven with oil/fat.

In our part of the world, we eat rice only with some curries. While cooking curry we put sometimes oil in that, and sometimes not. So when we don't put oil/fat, should I say, "I baked curry"; and when we put oil/fat, should I say, "I roasted curry".


Please help me.
 
  • Fredsie

    Member
    British English
    From a source :

    Bake - to cook in an oven without oil/fat
    Roast - to cook in an oven with oil/fat.

    In our part of the world, we eat rice only with some curries. While cooking curry we put sometimes oil in that, and sometimes not. So when we don't put oil/fat, should I say, "I baked curry"; and when we put oil/fat, should I say, "I roasted curry".


    Please help me.
    I wouldn't say either I 'baked' or 'roasted' curry. These words normally relate to cooking solid thing like a chicken or a cake. I would always say 'cooked' currry, on the assumtion that it's liquid and in some kind of dish.
     

    learning_grenglish

    Senior Member
    India
    Thank you friends. Now I am getting some idea about the usage of these words.

    Can I say,

    "I cooked cake"; or Must it be "I baked cake"?
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Cake is always baked. To keep all of these methods straight start with anything that is part of a liquid such as beans in water, pudding in milk. They would be cookedl.
    The key is not whether you use oil or anything else in the pan. The key is whether you use the oven. If you use the oven it will be either roast or bake. Okay? Now for the hard part. Roasting and baking is colloquial. You need to know what gets roasted and what gets baked. Cakes, potatoes,beans, onions and a long list of foods gets baked. Meat is roasted except for ham is baked, ribs are baked. Remember the key is the oven being used. The general word for the heating of all food is cooking.
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    I agree with most of the explanations so far, even if some are a little long-winded…, I hope you will be able to digest them without problem, learning_grenglish :D
    To cook is a general term
    To bake is using an oven, for cooking bread, stews (similar to some curries, which are cooked on an open flame, most of the time), potatoes (that's for 'jacket potatoes' but can also be boiled in a pan on an open flame…)
    To roast is cooking using an oven (most of the time) or on a barbecue. It usually involves basting with oil.

    I use my oven for general cooking (stews, curries, etc.), roasting as well as baking :rolleyes:. It all depends of the end-result what I want to achieve…
    As we say here, "it's horses for courses"
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Well, except that I cook many (quite liquid) curries in a casserole dish, in the oven!
    Yes, it's a bit of a conundrum, that.
    Still, I certainly wouldn't roast a curry - or a casserole.
    I just might bake a casserole - I think - but it sounds strange.
    I think I just cook it in the oven :)
    I like learning g's definitions in post #1. They sound about right to me as long as you don't apply them to runny things like curries, stews, casseroles ... ... ...

    I thought I'd come across this before - looking up bake in the WR dictionary, that much under-used resource, I found to bake meat?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I'm surprised by the references to oil with roasting. This may be a difference in
    culinary habits in AE and BE-speaking places. In an AE environment, roasting does
    not require oil, though basting is optional for some things cooked by roasting.

    Do BE speakers roast coffee beans using oil? Doubtful. Same for chestnuts.
    Do roast duck or turkey require oil? I suppose that's a matter of custom, rather than
    part of the verb's definition.
     

    learning_grenglish

    Senior Member
    India
    Thank you friends. I almost got the difference.

    In my home, I use egg in two ways to eat :
    In the first type I put the egg as it is purchased in the water(i.e. with the eggshell) for a while. After a while it becomes a solid round structure and I peel the cover and eat it.
    In the second type I break the eggshell first and put the (spicy yellow matter) on the pan spreading all over the pan and add oil to it, and leave it for a while. After a while I eat it.

    In the first one I think I am baking egg and in the second one I am roasting egg.
    Am I right?
     

    Fredsie

    Member
    British English
    The first one is definitely "boiling an egg"!

    Not sure about the second as we don't cook eggs that way here, but if you put oil in a pan and then break the egg into it, then that's "frying an egg".
     

    tinlizzy

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Thank you friends. I almost got the difference.

    In my home, I use egg in two ways to eat :
    In the first type I put the egg as it is purchased in the water(i.e. with the eggshell) for a while. After a while it becomes a solid round structure and I peel the cover and eat it. Boiling an egg
    In the second type I break the eggshell first and put the (spicy yellow matter) on the pan spreading all over the pan and add oil to it, and leave it for a while. After a while I eat it. Frying an egg

    In the first one I think I am baking egg and in the second one I am roasting egg.
    Am I right?
    Those cooking methods are on top of the oven (on the cook top or the burners) Baking and roasting are inside the oven (in a pan or baking dish) where the hot air temperature circulates and cooks the food. Baking refers to food made with flour (maida) or food that is coated or mixed with other ingredients cooked in an oven. Roasted food may be meat, seafood or vegetables, seasoned, with oil or in their own fat in an oven or in a grill (or wrapped in foil) or on the burners in a covered pan (like coffee and garlic).

    Tandoor=oven for baking and roasting.
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    Thank you friends. I almost got the difference.

    In my home, I use egg in two ways to eat :
    In the first type I put the egg as it is purchased in the water(i.e. with the eggshell) for a while. After a while it becomes a solid round structure and I peel the cover and eat it.
    In the second type I break the eggshell first and put the (spicy yellow matter) on the pan spreading all over the pan and add oil to it, and leave it for a while. After a while I eat it.

    In the first one I think I am baking egg and in the second one I am roasting egg.
    Am I right?
    First example = to boil an egg (placing any food in boiling water to cook it)
    2nd example = to cook an egg, or more precisely in this case, cooking an omelette. Some people also say "to fry an omelette" (option B).

    You could bake an egg by placing it in an oven, but this wouldn't be advisable: it would explode and wouldn't be energy efficient! :)
     

    learning_grenglish

    Senior Member
    India
    Thanks all friends. All your interpretation is going slowly inside my mind. I hope after a period of time I will understand it completely.

    More :
    In our part of the world, we don't bake or roast meat. But we make curry with meat to eat with rice. At the time, should I say, "I am cooking curried meat"?



    [For a side note : It will be fine if someone changes the thread title with "bake/roast/cook"]
     

    learning_grenglish

    Senior Member
    India
    Thank you.
    Have you ever eaten Tandoori chicken?
    Yes, I eat sometimes from outside, though. In my home, we only make curry with meat.

    I think "Tandoori chicken" is a roasted one? Am I right?

    I think it is roasted one because shopkeeper/seller put the raw meat directly on the fire.
     

    tinlizzy

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I think "Tandoori chicken" is a roasted one? Am I right?

    I think it is roasted one because shopkeeper/seller put the raw meat directly on the fire.
    Right! It's roasted in a Tandoor oven.

    Now if I mixed flour, eggs, water, baking powder, etc for a cake or sometimes naan and put it into this fire it would be called baking.

    At your house it is 'cooking' on top of the heat, which could be boiling, frying, sauteing, cooking.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    To bake means to cook something in an oven.

    Originally, to roast would hae suggested cooking something with dry heat by placing it over or before a fire. Frequently, that cooking would involve basting with a sauce or with a fat (inclding butter), but one could roast many things (for example, ears of corn, or peppers, or bulbs of garlic) without ever basting them. Now that open fires are not used for cooking anymore, we use the term "roast" to describe the dry-heat method of cooking that is being applied to foods that are in fact being "baked" (if one wants to get technical...) in an oven. The activity today is therefore much the same; the choice of word, though, is usually determined by custom: one would bake bread, but roast a leg of lamb.
     
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