Baked or baking dough

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Nicoclone

New Member
Indonesian - Indonesia
No baked dough would be a sure success one but of course will take longer drying time.
In the early 19th century, cooks in Naple, Italy, started a tradition of putting tomatoes on baking dough.
Is there any difference between "baked" and "baking"? Or are they both just explaining the same thing?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Welcome to the forum. :)

    First, you need to tell us the source of your first sentence – is it something you wrote?
    Second, you need to tell us what you want it to mean, because the meaning is not obvious?

    If you put tomatoes on baked dough, you put them on after the dough has finished baking and is sitting on the counter.
    If you put tomatoes on baking dough, you put them on when the dough is in the process of baking in the oven.
     

    Nicoclone

    New Member
    Indonesian - Indonesia
    The first sentence I searched from internet.
    The second one I took it from English textbook.
    I see, so that is the difference between "baked" and "baking".
    Thanks for the asnwer.
     
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