Balance ton porc !

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by jontxuBCN, Oct 20, 2017.

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  1. jontxuBCN New Member

    English
    How would you say 'balance ton porc' in English ?

    It's all in the news about Harvey Weinstein and this website and hashtag:
    Balance Ton Porc
    #BalanceTonPorc
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 20, 2017
  2. atcheque Senior Member

    français (France)
    Bonjour,

    Dictionary
     
  3. jontxuBCN New Member

    English
    Thanks, at first I thought it meant 'swing you pig' but that didn't sound right in the context. So I see it means 'don't keep quiet, i.e. report it, about sexual harassment'.

    Thanks a lot.
     
  4. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    As the title of a website, I guess "Spill the beans" might do it, or "Call him out".
     
  5. Kecha Senior Member

    Paris
    French (France)
    A number of journalists have tried different translations of it: "rat on your dirty old man" (BBC news), "expose your pig" (the Guardian), "squeal on your pig" (the Guardian and CNN), "grass up your pig"...
     
  6. Carcassonnaise

    Carcassonnaise Senior Member

    France
    British English
    Squeal on your pig has to be the best, surely...
     
  7. ostreologist New Member

    english
    I think ’rat on your pig’ sounds quite apt! And funny!
     
  8. Tandis_que New Member

    English-US
    Porc n'est pas de tout un reference aux parties, alors? Moi, j'aurais pensé, du context, que ca se traduit comme "keep it in your pants".
     
  9. Kecha Senior Member

    Paris
    French (France)
    While there are many colourful ways to qualify the nether regions, "porc" is not one of them to the best of my knowledge.
    And if it was the case, "balance" would then seem to intimate to swing it around, rather than keep it in.
     
  10. Pendrick Arrow New Member

    English - Canada
    I think the closest slang/colloquial translation in English would be “to rat him out” or “to call him out”, especially for a guy’s crude behaviour towards women.

    I prefer the formerly over the latter. However, there is a negative connotation to the person being called “a rat” when the onus should be squarely placed on “le porc” as it is clearly shown in the French expression.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2018
  11. Grop

    Grop Senior Member

    Provence
    français
    Report your swein.
     
  12. pointvirgule

    pointvirgule Senior Member

    Mtl, QC
    langue française
    For my part, I still think that Squeal on your pig (quoted by Kecha, #5) is brilliant.
     
  13. LART01

    LART01 Senior Member

    La Haye Pays-Bas
    French-France
    Bonsoir

    Non pas du tout. Se conduire comme un porc/ Etre un vrai avec les femmes = avoir un comportement inacceptable ( understatement)
     
  14. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    A little looser translation, but one I think could work:
    Expose the pig!
    N.B. I would not use "your" here in place of "the."
     
  15. tomy1 Senior Member

    montreal
    french
    balance ton porc is the french equivalent of me too in the usa but instead of being first oriented towards the victim it is ment to denounce the agressor.
    balancer quelqu'un is the slang for dénoncer quelqu'un and porc means a person acting as a pig (un cochon)
     
  16. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    If you add two hashtags and/or the word "movement," I would agree with you 100%.:)
    #balancetonporc is the French equivalent of #MeToo in the USA but, instead of primarily focusing on the victim, it is meant to denounce the aggressor.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup: (Not sure if caps are used in the French hashtag)
     
  17. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)

    But that misses the important description of ton porc

    Maybe Call the letch out!

    (The problem with pig in English is that it often refers to gluttony more than sexual perversion.)
     
  18. ForeverHis Senior Member

    American English
    Hi Wildan. Actually, we women often refer to men as pigs in the context of sexual harassment.
     
  19. tomy1 Senior Member

    montreal
    french
    In french also we have the two meanings manger comme un cochon (bad manners) et se comporter comme un porc (sexual behaviour toward women)
    tomy1
     
  20. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)

    Of course, but my point, as was also made by tomy1 above, is that French has two words that both translate into pig--porc and cochon, and that disambiguates the meaning more clearly than calling someone a "pig", which can have two meanings. You can also use "hog" for gluttony or avarice, but that still doesn't make "pig" just as clear.
     
  21. Pedro y La Torre Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English (Ireland)
    Right. The English "pig" is not a good translation for "porc" in this context. A porc is an aggressive pervert/sexual assailant. Why not just use the English-language equivalent "Me Too"?
     
  22. pointvirgule

    pointvirgule Senior Member

    Mtl, QC
    langue française
    Apparently, these people in the media didn't get your memo:

    Marriage Is Declining Because Men Are Pigs (Mother Jones)
    Our sex-obsessed culture is turning men into pigs (NY Post)

    As well as the women who coined the phrase male chauvinist pig.

    Context makes it clear that pig is meant as "disgusting person" rather than "glutton."

    Anyway.
     
  23. Soleil_Couchant

    Soleil_Couchant Senior Member

    currently in France
    English - US
    I agree with ForeverHis and pointvirgule... I was thinking of the chauvinist thing, too. I obviously can't say what the nuance of "porc" is in French, but in English (in America anyway) "pig" is definitely commonly used to describe a chauvinist type of guy who just sees women as objects and lusts after them... that kind of thing. Like, he'd see a women and only ever look at her boobs, or commonly comments on female strangers' physical body parts... He'd get the reaction "what a pig"...type of thing. So if porc means an "aggressive pervert"...okay, I guess that's not exactly a "pig" in English, lol, but... close enough. I think of male pigs as crass, lusty, immature, only caring about the sexual aspect of women.
     
  24. ForeverHis Senior Member

    American English
    Beautifully said Soleil Couchant! I've had reason to use that epithet many times in my life in order to call out an out-of-control lecher.

    Exactly! As we've all said before, context is everything.
     
  25. Pedro y La Torre Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English (Ireland)
    The sexual perversion aspect in the English 'pig' doesn't pack the same punch as the French 'porc'. It can be used, obviously, but it's not ideal.
     
  26. Blougouz

    Blougouz Senior Member

    Breizh
    french-France
    So basically:
    Porc=pig
    And
    Pork=(gros) cochon

    ?!
    And depending on the context, either bad manners in eating or towards women?
    :confused:
     
  27. Azarosa Senior Member

    Español (rioplatense)
    “Squeal on your pig” (loosely translated).
     
  28. janpol

    janpol Senior Member

    France
    France - français
    En français il me semble que "porc" est le terme le plus neutre pour désigner cet animal même s'il peut être riche de certaines connotations.
    En argot, "balancer" signifie aussi "jeter", se débarrasser de"
     
  29. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)

    This now outdated expression was popular at the same time many people called the police pigs, too.

    Hence my suggestion that while "pig" can refer to someone with crude sexual behavior, but also to a glutton or, in the 1960s, a cop. Hence my suggestion of an alternative, unambiguous term like letch.
    Quite true. Two different cultures reacting to a similar social situation with different approaches and emphases.
     
  30. Soleil_Couchant

    Soleil_Couchant Senior Member

    currently in France
    English - US
    But wildan1, I'm not sure about your insistence that "pig" can't (or ideally shouldn't) be used in this instance. While, yes, it can mean other things, apparently so can "porc." Both porc in French and pig in English have to do with men being gross letches, so what's the problem?
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2018
  31. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)

    No quibble that pig can mean letch. But colloquially pig can mean several other things but letch is only, well... a lecherous person.

    That gives an unequivocal sense of the intended meaning to someone who doesn't have any other context.
     
  32. Soleil_Couchant

    Soleil_Couchant Senior Member

    currently in France
    English - US
    True. And, in this case, there certainly is context.
     
  33. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    I'm not sure "letch" is commonly used in the US, although it'd be understood. I too like "Squeal on the pig". Given the atmosphere since Weinstein et al., I'd think it's clear what kind of pig or porc we're talking about - an "MCP".
     
  34. Gérard Napalinex

    Gérard Napalinex Senior Member

    Lyon, France
    French - France
    As it's been mentioned earlier, "balance" also means "swing".
    Now "balance ton corps" (swing your body) happens to be a pretty common sexual harrasment sentence.

    "Balance ton porc" is hence a wonderful pun, as well as a powerful catchword.

    Now I'm not saying this will make translation easier :D
     
  35. ForeverHis Senior Member

    American English
    There's a difference between a lecher and a pig, at least sometimes.

    According to Dictionary.com the definiton of "lecher" is:
    a man given to excessive sexual indulgence; a lascivious or licentious man.

    Now, a lecher is not necessarily an overt pig. A pig, in this context, is a man who crosses the line and engages in an overtly offensive sexual manner. A guy who likes to ogle women but isn't too creepy about it probably wouldn't be called out as a pig by many women. A lecherous guy who makes unwelcome sexual comments or advances is a pig. But an otherwise decent guy who momentarily loses self-control and kisses me on the mouth without permission would be neither a lecher or a pig in my opinion.

    "Squeal on the pig" gets my vote.
     
  36. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    I agree with pv, S_C, ain'tt and FH. If I were to translate letch / lecher to French, it would be vicieux / pervers... not porc.

    Add my vote to Squeal on the pig.:thumbsup: I prefer the even if the French says your.
    Extrait de l'article Dénonce ton cochon (je suis plus portée à dire « cochon » que « porc ») :
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2018
  37. JClaudeK

    JClaudeK Senior Member

    Paris
    Français France; Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    C'est sans doute pour ça qu'elle n'a pas choisi "Dénonce ton cochon", beaucoup trop "soft".

    Je ne dirais pas ça. Ce sont deux appels à agir contre le harcèlement sexuel consécutifs (en France en tout cas), n'ayant pas tout à fait les mêmes visées:

    Après #BalanceTonPorc, # MeToo fait le tour du monde pour dénoncer le harcèlement sexuel

    "Si toutes les femmes harcelées ou agressées sexuellement écrivaient “moi aussi” dans leur statut, on pourrait donner aux gens une idée de l’ampleur du problème" a-t-elle publié sur Twitter.
     
  38. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    C'est bien ce que j'avais compris.

    Mais je n'y peux rien si « cochon » - que je ne trouve pas "soft" - me vient plus naturellement que « porc » dans ce sens extrait du CNRTL sous B 2. b) :
    Ou celui-ci, du Petit Robert :
     
  39. wendyredredrobin

    wendyredredrobin Senior Member

    English UK
    Unless I'm mistaken, nobody has mentioned the equivalent hashtag for English speakers: #MeToo where women (and some men), including me, flooded Twitter with their experiences of various levels of harassment from verbal remarks to serious sexual assault women-worldwide-use-hashtag-metoo-against-sexual-harassment
     
  40. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    Actually, the hahstag #MeToo has been mentioned several times. You may have missed/skipped a few posts. :)

    But a translation to French would be : #MoiAussi.
     
  41. wendyredredrobin

    wendyredredrobin Senior Member

    English UK
    Oops, I did skim through, I have to say, and I am capable of translating "me too" into French, believe it or not!
     
  42. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    I never thought otherwise.I just meant to add - with sample sentences - that this exact French equivalent does exist, at least in Quebec.

    Whereas balance ton porc seems to be mostly in France. :)
     
  43. justAthought New Member

    English
    the game’s up
     
  44. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    Welcome to the forums, justAthought! I think, though, that "the game's up" may be too general.
     
  45. Soleil_Couchant

    Soleil_Couchant Senior Member

    currently in France
    English - US
    Was "game's up" a spin on the new "time's up!" thing emerging in Hollywood lol? (about not allowing a system that permits sexual abusers or silences victims)
     
  46. justAthought New Member

    English
    9o7
    I agree also that in such situations Brave is A VERB
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 10, 2018
  47. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    Come to think of it, though, an MCP can refer to a man who thinks that women are inferior. Although it is usually associated with thinking of women as sex objects, it can be said of a man who only speaks about or treats (non-physically) women in this way. It's when he harasses women that a "pig" is a molester. But that's the context in the hashtag and the particular aspect of sexual behavior that it addresses.

    By the way, speaking of political correctness, we thankfully have not yet seen "gender offender" and "gender crime" coined.
     
  48. Pedro y La Torre Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English (Ireland)
    What is this supposed to mean exactly?
     
  49. janpol

    janpol Senior Member

    France
    France - français
    Si nous tournons un peu en rond autour des termes porc, pig, cochon, pork appelons-le "gros verrat"d'autant que, n'ayant pas été castré, celui-ci devrait être encore plus crédible.
     
  50. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    'verrat' means 'hog', and 'hog' in EN is associated with greed, not sexual behavior. Maybe 'goret', to belittle the oinker? And "Expose the pig!" does relate to the fact that some of the men discussed expose their genitals to women.
     

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