bald outline

Masis

Senior Member
Bulgarian
To build upon this bald outline, the military historian is obliged to lool at the lie the land, the archaelogical and historiacal evidence for the character of this terrain in the 8th century AD, what is known about the armies involved, their elements, equipment and tactical traditions.


Hello. Pleace help me with this words here. I never met such a combination of words and I can not understand it at all. Thanks a lot.
 
  • I think it means that it's just an outline, with nothing else on it. It might be that they have only discovered the basic outline, and now they need more information (for example historical evidence) to build upon that knowledge?
     

    Masis

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Thanks. Is there any posibility that this mean like bald tyre? I mean bald contour. The sentense like -To rely on such bald contour and etc...
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sorry, Masis, I don't understand your supplementary question.

    "This bald outline" will refer back to something earlier in the text, probably in the sentence before the one you quote.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've just been studying the battle of Alesia where Caesar says he built 25 miles of fortifications round the hill, to keep Vercingetorix in, and then a further 27 miles of fortifications round his own besieging forces, to keep a massive army of 250,000 Gauls out. That left his own army as a sort of Roman meat in a Gallic sandwich.

    Caesar gives the bald outline of the battle in the Gallic Wars. I'm off next week to Alesia (in Burgundy, near Semur-en-Auxois) to see what the country itself can tell me further about the battle. Clearly I won't be investigating the matter as thoroughly as Masis's military historians, but the principle is rather the same.
     

    Masis

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Thanks a lot. I understand that Thomas say but I understand everithing without the bald outline. I understand this like I say previously - unclear explanation or unclear contour. Am I right or not?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    No, Masis. "Bald outline" means something like "description with little detail".

    If you gave us the sentence before the one you've quoted, and perhaps the one before that, we might be able to make this clearer for you.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    "Bald" used this way means "bare", or "plain", or "without details". A bald tire is called "bald" because it has been made smooth, and now lacks the ridges and furrows that once gave it a more complex shape -- so in that sense, there is some similarity in the use of the word.
     

    Masis

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    In mine dictionary bald is translated like worn out, shabby, out of elbows. This exatly for tyres. I think that because of lack of information about this battle, the author says that the outline is exatly like tyre which is already smooth from use. I hope you understand my point of view here. The outline is uncrtain with it countures blured.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi Masis,

    I'm not sure this is quite right. I think the word bald has more the meaning of stark here, devoid of any ornament. The outline is without details but it is far from blurred: it lacks elaboration.
     

    Masis

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Thanks. Yes maybe that is the right translation. That this outline has a lack of details. The word naked work too. It is a little metaphoric in this usage but works again. Generally the historian want to say that the information is very poor. It is very insufficient for us to understand the reality of this battle.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    In mine dictionary bald is translated like worn out, shabby, out of elbows.
    That is not what bald means!!!!

    The word "bald" means "without hair", or by extension "lacking a usual or natural covering, such as of fur, or feathers, or vegetation".

    Winston Churchill, Sean Connery, and Patrick Stewart are all examples of bald men -- but none of them could be described as "shabby", or "worn out"! Many babies are born bald, and then grow hair as they get older. The bird that is the symbol of the United States is the bald eagle, which is called that because the feathers on its head are white, giving it the appearance of having a shaved head. The reason, therefore, that an old tire is called a "bald tire" is not that it is worn out, but that it is smooth, like the head of a man who has no hair.
     
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