Bale

  • Lagartija

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It's correct. In the book appears as baled
    We all baled into the hall

    Thank you very much for your help
    Pues...creo que es mal escrito. "Baled into something" means it is collected and tied into a bale.

    BALED:
    A large package of raw or finished material tightly bound with twine or wire and often wrapped: a bale of hay.
    tr.v. baled, bal·ing, bales To wrap in a bale or in bales: a machine that bales cotton.
     

    scotu

    Senior Member
    Chicago English
    It's correct. In the book appears as baled
    We all baled into the hall

    Thank you very much for your help
    It must be a misspelling in the book. baled would not fit unless the "we" refers to a group of turtles.

    bal·ing.
    –noun 1.a large bundle or package prepared for shipping, storage, or sale, esp. one tightly compressed and secured by wires, hoops, cords, or the like, and sometimes having a wrapping or covering: a bale of cotton; a bale of hay. 2.a group of turtles. –verb (used with object) 3.to make or form into bales: to bale wastepaper for disposal.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/baled
     

    aleCcowaN

    Senior Member
    Castellano - Argentina
    Sin poder afirmar nada, a mí "we all baled into the hall" me suena a "en el hall, apretados todos como sardinas (en lata)"
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    En inglés británico, se puede decir igualmente "bale" y "bail".

    Pero you suelo usar "bail"............


    Loob
     

    gaberdine

    New Member
    inglés
    Estoy bastante seguro que "to bail (out)" venga de "ebonics" y significa salir. Creo que puede tener el significado de salir con prisa, pero no necesariamente.

    Un ejemplo es; "I am going to bail (out). This party is boring."

    Espero que mi explicación ayudare a alguien.
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    I did a Google search on "baled into the"
    and found the following parapraph:

    “Ships are constructed for safety, with separate, water-tight compartments in their bottoms. If one compartment springs a leak it fills with water; but the good ship goes on unhurt. Were it not for the separating bulkheads one leak would sink the vessel. Now it often happens that while I am occupied with clients, other clients with conflicting interests call. With the assistance of an office boy, I cause the dangerous influx to be diverted into separate compartments, while I sound with my legal plummet the depth of each. If necessary they may be baled into the hallway and permitted to escape by way of the stairs...."

    This shows that the expression is used, although paraphrased with a ship's terminology.

    Ah, ha, I found a better one:
    "The girls headed off to get tea or something and the lads baled into the car and headed back to Baltimore."

    This last example is more closely related to the one of this thread.

    So, I interpret "baled into the hall" as "rushed or jumped into the hall."
    What do you guys think?

    Saludos.
     

    gaberdine

    New Member
    inglés
    If necessary they may be baled into the hallway and permitted to escape by way of the stairs...."

    "Baled" is actually spelled bailed, and in the context of the former sentence, bailed is referring to emptying water from a ship by using "bails." "Bails" are containers which hold water and are used to empty water from a boat.

    I have never heard of bailing water from a boat until now. If the original poster was referring to emptying water from a boat than that option makes sense and is correct.

    However, "to bail" or "to bale" however it may be spelled, meaning to leave, is much more commonly heard and spoken in my experience. Since it is not standard english, it is not in a standard dictionary, so I don't know how it is spelled. Yes it is slang, but it is still used fairly a lot, so I posted my opinion, that it could very well mean to leave into the hallway. My only point is that it does not always mean to leave in a hurry, although it can, depending on what one is "bailing" from. I think it would've saved a lot of trouble if someone had asked for more context from the beginning, because, "bale" and "bail" have a number of different meanings.

    I hope that was some help.
     

    aurilla

    Senior Member
    Am Eng/PR Spanish
    I agree that the person who wrote it used the wrong word. He / She probably meant to say "bailed," but wrote "baled".

    (That doesn't say much about the students in whatever college that may be...unless it was a typo.)
     
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