bang tidy

buzzinbashment

Member
english
Bonjour à tous!

J'ai besoin de votre aide avec cette phrase plutot moderne et répandue de nos jour en Angleterre: 'bang tidy'. Cette phrase a été inventée par la vedette à la fois polemique, populaire et excentrique, Keith Lemon fameusement dans sa emission, 'Celebrity Juice'.

Cette phrase et vraiment versatile, et on peut l'utiliser dans deux senses principales:

1. une description d'une fille- plus probablement une bombe, par exemple:

Mec A: 'wow i have taken quite a fancy to Megan Fox, she's rather nice'
Mec B: 'indeed, she's well bang tidy.'

2. une situation positive:

Mec A: 'Did you see that Le Tissier goal? He lobbed the keeper from 30 yards, it was bang tidy'.


ca sera fantastique de trouver la traduction de cette phrase pour la prochaine fois que je visite votre pays.

Buzzin'
 
  • jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    Welcome, Buzzinbashment.

    Translations of recently invented expressions are always tough. You might be interested in this discussion about usage and translation of bien foutu. It's not perfect, but it should do the trick at least in some contexts.

    Hopefully the native speakers will have some suggestions. :)
     

    Hardcore_Linguist

    New Member
    UK
    English-UK
    Hi buzzinbashment,

    first of all thanks for bringing this one up, it's a phrase I use frequently with friends and work colleagues and have wanted to find a suitable translation for quite some time now. Keith Lemon is a veritable goldmine of unique and thought-provoking phrases and continues to fly the flag for quirky creativity in the English language. Secondly, the examples you put forward are spot on and you've clearly put a lot of thought into this thread. May I ask which Le Tissier goal in particular you are referring to?

    Jann, I concur that input from a native French speaker would be invaluable in progressing this thread, particularly if said native speaker has prior knowledge of Lemon's varied and extensive body of material.

    As both a professional linguist and an avid fan of avant-garde comedy I await the resolution of this thread with bated breath.

    Kind regards,


    Hardcore_Linguist.
     

    arbitrator_phd

    New Member
    English (a.k.a. Lingua Franca)
    Hi,

    This is a tricky one! It's refreshing to see such expressions travel accross borders onto new territories and raise interest of fellow linguists!

    Could a literal translation perhaps be appropriate?

    "T'as vu le but de le Tissier?"
    "Ouais, c'était boum réglo" ?

    Since the expression is innovative in English, I could envision a little experimentation in French as well, for example:
    "T'as vu le but de le Tissier?"
    "Ouais, c'était gros comme un patapouf!"

    I'm sure there's a lot more to be said about this one, keeping an eye on this thread!

    arbitrator
     

    buzzinbashment

    Member
    english
    many thanks all for the continued contributions. would 'gros comme un patapouf' be acceptable to use in every day usage, like 'arbitrator' suggests, to say describe something 'immense', 'epic' or 'mint'? I would like to know.

    [...]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    arbitrator_phd

    New Member
    English (a.k.a. Lingua Franca)
    Hi basement,

    Is this one of the expressions used by that same TV host?

    It would be interesting to have someone with some knowledge of French TV slang, perhaps with interest in current media and sports to voice his opinion on those. I know France has its very own brand of rap and R&B, would this perhaps be a resource to find an equivalent to those expressions?

    f.e. bang tidy - 200% creuvard ?
    [...]
    From Pour Ceux - Mafia K1 Fry

    Au charbon comme le jeune
    Fresh pour les flèches 200% creuvard, trop puissant, malin et rusé
    Lève ton majeur bien haut si tu m'sens venir Samir est là,
    Dry est là et le coup risque de partir


    Merci
    arbitrator
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Papa Bouba Pepper

    New Member
    English - UK
    Hello Buzzin,

    I have also heard the phrase 'bang tidy' used as follows:
    Bloke A: How was your night out?
    Bloke B: Bang tidy. I drank a whole bath full of vodka redbull with my mate Keith and listened to some tunes
    Could I use 'canon' in this context?

    PBP
     

    Guerric

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Hardly... "canon" is used to mean beautiful/nicely done/... but
    mostly applies to women.
    soirée canon doesn't make much sense to me...and un but canon would rather, if ever used, relate to the speed of the ball than to the beauty of the kick/tactics used to score.

    In all the examples of this thread, one could say "comme je les aime".
    [Cette fille est/ C'était un but/ J'ai passé une soirée] comme je les aime.
    But this is not enough slangy...Agreed.

    I think d'enfer/du tonnerre is okay (its proper equivalent in English being "a hell of a ..."). It's not a perfect match, but everyone would get what is meant.

    If I were to stick to the original meaning of the phrase (which I believe is: fuck worthy), I'd probably go with bandant, which could be translated as A ... so nice it gave/gives me a boner.

    Anyway, it's possible to find an equivalent for each specific context, but it seems impossible to find one that would be a perfect fit in all possible contexts.
     

    buzzinbashment

    Member
    english
    many thanks for the continued thought on this, i like the sound of 'du tonnerre'- the equivalent in english is popular and quite widely used.

    i might have to add that the main sentiments behind the phrase 'bang tidy' are not overtly sexual- i feel for example 'bandant' although perhaps being a literal translation is rather too uncooth for the english meaning. Still useful to know however.

    For anyone interested in seeing Mr Lemon in action, he is available via the medium of television, his series started again last night.

    Papa Bouba Pepper, may I be as so forward as to ask whether you have had many 'soirées canons' in The Palace of Dreams from where you originate? This seem, a quite magical and mystical place!

    one last thing, Arby's point of "200% creuvard"- is this at all relevant?

    Many thanks

    Buzzin'
     

    buzzinbashment

    Member
    english
    Hi Guerric

    No, you are right, it does have such conotations, along the same lines as 'bonk' 'hump' and 'kaboom'.

    But in this sense, its a meaning slightly removed ;)
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    Hi Guerric

    No, you are right, it does have such conotations, along the same lines as 'bonk' 'hump' and 'kaboom'.

    But in this sense, its a meaning slightly removed ;)
    Well, you learn something new every day - I would have guessed that its origins were in expressions like "bang on", in the sense of "exactly right"!!! So that's one more expression I will have to avoid using as of now!:D
     

    Dentdecheval

    New Member
    French
    Hi all.
    I have come across this thread serendipitously... I might have a solution for you:
    What about “un tire noble”?
    This easily serves both contexts ( professional soccer or within the parameter of Celebrity Juice)
    Andree: “Apres maintes soirées en tête â tête, Sophie a finalement succombé â mon charme”
    Tarquine: “ je vois…un tire noble!”

    Thierry: “Le Tissier a mit un de ces but… Foudroyant”
    Jacques:”Mais tout a fait Thierry!!! Même la defense applaudit: un tire noble….”
    This combines the "admiration" conotation that I could not quite find amongst the previous submissions, as well as a certain crudeness which embodies the spirit of "bang-tidy"

    I hope this helps
     
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