bantam

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ManOfWords

Senior Member
Português [Brasil]
bantam <-----Topic added to post by moderator (Florentia52)----->

Hi, one of its meaning is: pertly combative

could I say that a boy is a bantam? or, is it used in animals only? and, was it ever used for people? ''That kid is so bantam with the others!'' o_O
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Please give us the context in which you would say "That boy is a bantam" or "That kid is so bantam with the others."
     

    ManOfWords

    Senior Member
    Português [Brasil]
    I meant it like, that kid likes to get in a fight or like, that kid faces every kid and is ready to fight at any moment ...
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    'Bantam' is a noun and not an adjective, as lingob point out, so:

    That bantam kid'.:cross:
    That kid is so bantam with the others!:cross:

    "That kid is a bantam" is technically correct but not idiomatic: it is not something we would normally say about a boy who's always getting into fights.
     
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    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    As Lingo says it can mean 'a small aggressive person', but the problem with 'bantam' is that its main meaning is 'a small chicken' without referring to male or female. I used to keep them. Therefore unless the context makes it absolutely clear that you are talking about a fighting person it just sounds as if you are just saying that they are 'very small/tiny' or you're literally calling them 'a small chicken'.

    'That bantam kid' to me would mean 'That tiny kid' or literally 'That kid that's a bit like a small chicken.' :) (Both of which wouldn't really be very complimentary.)

    'Bantamweight' as a weight class in boxing obviously conjures up the idea of someone who is small and aggressive in the boxing ring, and that in turn reminds you of the bantam cockerel and not the hen.

    If I were actually pointing to someone who is fighting well I might say 'That kid fights like a bantam!' where it is clear that you are referring to their aggression and fighting skills.

    ‘When there was no one else to spar with, he and his brother Johnny, who's now 16, would flail at each other like mad bantams.’
    bantam | Definition of bantam in English by Oxford Dictionaries
     
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    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "That kid is a bantam" is technically correct but not idiomatic: it is not something we would normally say about a boy who's always getting into fights.
    :thumbsup:
    Note that "bantam" is strictly an age classification in Canadian ice hockey leagues, e.g.
    • Atom (Squirt): under 11 years of age[4]
    • Peewee: under 13 years of age[5]
    • Bantam: under 15 years of age[6]
    • Midget: under 18 years of age[7]
     
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