bare = "a lot of"? (slang)

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Gavril

Senior Member
English, USA
I just heard that "bare" is used in some forms of UK slang to mean "a lot of": e.g., "Bare bikes on the streets today!" would mean you saw a great many bicycles on the streets that day. Is this accurate?

I would have guessed that bare bikes meant "nothing but bikes" -- in other words, the emphasis is on the lack of other kinds of vehicles, rather than the number of bikes specifically -- but I may be wrong.

Thanks for any info
 
  • Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    One other question: when people use "bare" in this meaning, do they normally say, "There were bare bikes on the street" or "There was bare bikes on the street"? (Or both?)

    Thanks again.
     

    bvphat

    New Member
    Vietnamese-Vietnam
    Bare is a Britain Slang for "Very", "a lot of" (source 1).
    But the word "Bare" in "Bare bikes on the streets today!" may not be slangy, It means a "Naked Bike Ride" (source 2)
     
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