barely hardly

Akasaka

Senior Member
Japanese
Hello world,
Could you please help me with some grammar?

I had barely enough money to buy it.

Can I use "hardly" here instead? Of course, I know the meaning changes to the negative side. Also, can I use "slightly" instead of "barely"?
 
  • Victoria32

    Senior Member
    English (UK) New Zealand
    Hello world,
    Could you please help me with some grammar?

    I had barely enough money to buy it.

    Can I use "hardly" here instead? Of course, I know the meaning changes to the negative side.
    On balance, no, "hardly" doesn't quite convey the same meaning - and it sounds wrong, also...

    Vicky
     
    Hello world,
    Could you please help me with some grammar?

    I had barely enough money to buy it.

    Can I use "hardly" here instead? Of course, I know the meaning changes to the negative side. Also, can I use "slightly" instead of "barely"?
    Hello Akasaka,

    I had hardly enough money to buy it. :tick:

    No, you can't use "slightly" in this context. If you wanted to you could say -

    "I had slightly less than the money needed to buy it."

    LRV
    _____________________________
    :D We are frequently amused.:D
     

    Tresley

    Senior Member
    British English
    I had barely enough money to buy it.
    Hello Akasaka,

    In your example phrase, I would naturally say:

    "I only just had enough money to buy it"

    However, I would use 'barely', or 'hardly', or 'scarcely' in the following expression:

    "I barely have enough money to get me through the week"
    "I hardly have enough money to get me through the week"
    "I scarcely have enough money to get me through the week"

    They all mean the same (i.e. not enough money to last until the end of the week, or it will be hard to find money for a whole week)

    I hope this helps.
     

    Akasaka

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you very much for your advice.
    "I have barely enough money to get me through the week"
    "I barely have enough money to get me through the week"
    They're both correct, aren't they. I sometimes have difficulty deciding where to put adverbs.
     

    cheshire

    Senior Member
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    On balance, no, "hardly" doesn't quite convey the same meaning - and it sounds wrong, also...

    Vicky
    Is it because the word order just isn't right that you feel so? Do you mean the following? Thank you very much!

    I had hardly enough money to buy it.:cross:
    I hardly had enough money to buy it.:tick:

     

    eddiemel7778

    Senior Member
    Portuguese/Brazil
    First of all let me say Hi to everyone. I'd like to share some tips from what I have learnt. Overall, you put the adverb before main verbs and after the verb to be and modals (can, could, may, should etc).

    Ex: I never go to school on Sundays.
    I am always late for school.
    I can hardly speak a word in French.

    But there are some adverbs that you can place them in front, middle and end positions. For instance: sometimes, usually and many others.

    Ex: Sometimes, I go to the movies with my father.
    I sometimes go to the movies with my father.
    I go to the movies with my father sometimes.

    But if I were you, I would probably follow the basic rule in order to avoid making mistakes and worrying too much.

    I hope I have helped a bit.
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    Last edited by a moderator:

    TommyGun

    Senior Member
    Hello!
    "I barely have enough money to get me through the week"
    "I hardly have enough money to get me through the week"
    "I scarcely have enough money to get me through the week"

    They all mean the same (i.e. not enough money to last until the end of the week, or it will be hard to find money for a whole week)
    That is interesting.
    I am onto this barely/hardly stuff, and think that the first sentence, with barely, can be perceived ambiguously.
    I barely have enough money to get me through the week.

    It could mean:
    1) as you've suggested - not enough money, or it will be hard to get it.
    2) only just enough money, i.e. money is enough, but only for ascetic living.

    I am interested which of this senses of barely is more natural in this context. Are there any US/UK differences on barely?
     
    Last edited:

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    For me barely means only just. So it's the second meaning that's the correct one. I suppose in practical terms in terms of getting through the week, it's difficult to draw the line between 'just only enough' and 'very nearly enough'. It becomes clearer if you consider a fixed sum: 'I have barely enough money to pay my rent'. That means that you can​ pay the rent, but only just.
     

    Margarita84

    Member
    Español, España
    Hi!
    Could someone tell me which is the exactly translation of:
    Barely the place for an internationally famous exhibition attracting 15000 visitors, one would think. Could be: <Spanish deleted>
    And why cann´t I use "Hardly" instead of "Barely"?
    Thank you!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    MirandaEscobedo

    Senior Member
    British English
    Barely the place for an internationally famous exhibition attracting 15000 visitors, one would think. Could be: <Spanish deleted>
    And why cann´t I use "Hardly" instead of "Barely"?


    It should be 'hardly' not 'barely'.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Margarita84

    Member
    Español, España
    Now I am more confused...I have read that barely is <Spanish deleted>, in which case you use one or the other? Thank you very much
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
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