barf

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Saurabh

Senior Member
English-British, Hindi
Hello Friends!

I know barf means to Vomit.

I am wondering, the following sentences would sound idiomatic to Native ears:

1. I barfed.
2. She barfed-up the food she ate minutes before.
3. He is barfing.
4. He barfs when he takes wine.
5. I had barfed before the doctor came.

I do not know above are right or wrong. Do we have to fix up after the word barf as I did in sentence 2 or does the word barf work on its own?
Would it have another meaning if the word up was fixed after barf?
I searched on the forum however it did not return any result except the word meaning of barf which was already known to me.
Please help.
Cheers,
Saurabh
 
  • Ann O'Rack

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK English
    I wouldn't use a hyphen, but would use UP, because in this sentence you are saying what he vomitted, not just the fact that he did vomit, as in the other sentences.

    (Incidentally, I find it really funny to see someone conjugating the verb "to barf" - well done for making me smile! :D )
     

    Saurabh

    Senior Member
    English-British, Hindi
    I wouldn't use a hyphen, but would use UP, because in this sentence you are saying what he vomitted, not just the fact that he did vomit, as in the other sentences.

    (Incidentally, I find it really funny to see someone conjugating the verb "to barf" - well done for making me smile! :D )
    Can I use barf in all places where I have to use vomit?:confused:
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Say it often enough and barf starts to sound like dog-talk. :) Which is a lead-up to suggest that barf is very casual (and gross and funny and juvenile and I could go on), while vomit is more clinical and formal. The words mean the same but they're not usually used for the same audiences.
     

    phanmo

    Member
    English-Canada, French-France and Canada
    Thy're all correct, if childish.
    In number 4, you wouldn't usually say "takes" wine, "drinks" would be more appropriate.

    In polite conversation, "to be sick" or "to throw up" could be used.
    "Please excuse me, I think I'm going to be sick"
     
    Last edited:

    Saurabh

    Senior Member
    English-British, Hindi
    Say it often enough and barf starts to sound like dog-talk. :) Which is a lead-up to suggest that barf is very casual (and gross and funny and juvenile and I could go on), while vomit is more clinical and formal. The words mean the same but they're not usually used for the same audiences.
    Thank you, Copyright.:)
     

    Saurabh

    Senior Member
    English-British, Hindi
    Thy're all correct, if childish.
    In number 4, you wouldn't usually say "takes" wine, "drinks" would be more appropriate.

    In polite conversation, "to be sick" or "to throw up" could be used.
    "Please excuse me, I think I'm going to be sick"
    Thank you, Phanmo.:)
    However, why these would have to childish?

    That's been my original question. What else way would each be said if mine weren't idiomatic?

    Cheers
    Saurabh
    Note- I noted your suggestion of drinks in place of takes and liked it:) thanks
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I know barf means to V vomit.

    I am wondering, if the following sentences would sound idiomatic to Native ears:

    1. I barfed. :tick: colloquial register.
    2. She barfed-up the food she ate minutes before. It's an odd mixture of colloquial and a nearly formal register. "barfed up" is correct, as you reference what was vomited.
    3. He is barfing. :tick:
    4. He barfs when he takes drinks wine. :tick:
    5. I had barfed before the doctor came. :cross: It is not idiomatic to use such a colloquial term in a clinical description. There is nothing wrong from a grammatical standpoint, but it doesn't sound like ordinary native English.
    Barf is an informal term, and sounds a little out of place in more formal settings. It's a perfectly good word in the right surroundings. You will sometimes see it with up, when the lunch, dinner, food, rotten quail, or other material is named. In fact it is practically required when you name the items or material that was barfed.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Barf is also more of a North American term. In the UK we would be more likely to use phanmo's alternatives "to be sick" or "to throw up" - these can be used formally or informally (although "to throw up" is the more informal of the two).

    Other slang terms are "chuck up", "blow chunks" and "do the technicolour yawn". If one is vomiting into a toilet we can say "speaking on the porcelain telephone" or "driving the porcelain bus".
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    <Moderator note: This thread is about the use of barf and barf-up. There are many other threads that discuss the long list of alternative expressions for vomiting. If you wish to add to those, please feel free to do so. Thanks.>

    puke
    sick
    when someone pretend to be vomiting


    Topic reminder:


    I know barf means to Vomit.

    I am wondering, the following sentences would sound idiomatic to Native ears:

    1. I barfed.
    2. She barfed-up the food she ate minutes before.
    3. He is barfing.
    4. He barfs when he takes wine.
    5. I had barfed before the doctor came.
     
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