barge and thrust

< Previous | Next >

GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello,
Can the two verbs be used as synonyms in this sentence: ''She barged/thrust past me without saying a word.''? They look similar in meaning to me. Also, can I say ''He stormed/rushed/thrust into my room.'', instead of ''He barged into my room.''? It should be possible. Which one sounds most natural to you?
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I dont think you can use thrust to describe a normal range of human walking. Your examples sound odd, for sure, though the first one might work the second one sounds very wrong. I'd want to know WHAT he thrust into your room!
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Since "thrust" is normally transitive, it doesn't work here since there's no object. It also implies goiing through or between something.

    "Barged" implies moving through people or obstacles and perhaps pushing them out of the way.

    "Stormed" implies some sort of speech or action more than just movement. It does not necessarily involve moving somebody out of the way.
     
    Last edited:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I am really sorry about mentioning ''thrust'' and I would like to apologize. Macmillan let me down again. It says that it can be used intransitively in this sense. I am very sorry :(.
    Don't be sorry. Nobody's upset, nobody's laughing, life goes on.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    To thrust past someone is a common enough variant of push past, at least in writing. Like push, it implies physical contact.
    But its use with other prepositions sounds literary or old-fashioned. On the other hand, it is often used to talk about someone giving birth.

    Words like barge and storm focus more on the suddenness or violence of the action.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    An example by the WR dictionary: ''She thrust through the crowd until she was next to him.'' Thrust is transitive as already mentioned above. Would that sentence sound odd in everyday English? I think so.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    An example by the WR dictionary: ''She thrust through the crowd until she was next to him.'' Thrust is transitive as already mentioned above. Would that sentence sound odd in everyday English? I think so.
    :thumbsup:
    I would expect "She thrust herself through the crowd," but perhaps the author considered the "herself) to be "understood."

    [cross-posted]
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top