barge in

< Previous | Next >

kahroba

Senior Member
Persian
Dear all
Please kindly tell me what's your interpretation for "if she didn't barge in ..." in the following context, taken from "Margo Dowling" in "The Big Money" by Dos Passos:
In the busstation there was a lunch counter. She went in to spend her fifteen cents. She'd get more for the ring at a hockshop if she didn't barge in on an empty stomach, was what she was thinking as she sat down at the counter and ordered a cup of coffee and a sandwich.
Could "if she didn't barge in..." mean "if she couldn't stand the empty stomach"?
 
  • cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I read this as: "if she didn't rush headlong into the hockshop while very hungry." She seems to be reasoning that she would be able to convince the hockshop owner to give her more money if she had some food in her stomach at the time, or perhaps that the desperation that hunger can give you would make her more likely to accept a smaller amount for the ring than she ought to receive.

    One of the definitions for "barge" as a verb at Merriam-Webster online is:

    2 : to thrust oneself heedlessly or unceremoniously <barged into the meeting>
     

    kahroba

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Now I can read it the right way, thanks to your comment. I wonder how couldn't I see that in the first place; old age I think!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top