Barge into or in to/break into or in to/pull into or in to

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I'm about to learn

Senior Member
Italian-Italy
"The cops barged in to the apartment"
"The cops barged into the apartment"
Same with break in to/into.
"He is pulling in to the parking lot"
"He is pulling into the parking lot"
Is there any difference between these sentences? Can I say in both ways? Is it the same thing?
 
  • Amedeo Baragiola

    Member
    Italian/ English (IRL) - bilingual
    Hello,

    into and in to have different meanings in English:
    into is a preposition than means "to the inside", while in to is used when in is part of the verb itself.

    Therefore:

    He is pulling in to the parking lot :cross:
    He is pulling into the parking lot :tick:

    The cops barged in to the apartment :cross:
    The cops barged into the apartment :tick:
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    He is pulling in to the parking lot :cross:
    He is pulling into the parking lot :tick:
    I wish it were that simple because it's something I have to stop and think about sometimes.

    If I'm driving I can say to my friend with me, "I'm going to pull in here." meaning to go close to the curb so he can get out. "I'm going to get close (to the curb) at this spot.

    "Pull in" is the verb here (as far as I can tell). So I could definitely "pull in" to something, like a parking lot.

    I'm interested in how others see it.
     

    Amedeo Baragiola

    Member
    Italian/ English (IRL) - bilingual
    I wish it were that simple because it's something I have to stop and think about sometimes.

    If I'm driving I can say to my friend with me, "I'm going to pull in here." meaning to go close to the curb so he can get out. "I'm going to get close (to the curb) at this spot.

    "Pull in" is the verb here (as far as I can tell). So I could definitely "pull in" to something, like a parking lot.

    I'm interested in how others see it.
    Sure, your sentence is acceptable as well.. as you pointed out yourself however "pull in" is - as a whole - a verb here so the rule above still holds.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I disagree with post #4. In my opinion, "pull in" is a verb, but is not the verb in "pull into". "Pull in to" and "pull into" have different meanings.

    "Pull into X" means "get inside X". So does "barge into X".

    If I'm driving I can say to my friend with me, "I'm going to pull in here." meaning to go close to the curb so he can get out. "I'm going to get close (to the curb) at this spot.
    This is a good example. "Pull in" means "move close to something". Adding "to" doesn't change "close" to "inside", since we also say "I'm going to pull in to the curb". That means get close to the curb, not get inside the curb.
     

    I'm about to learn

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    So are you saying that they are both acceptable?
    Which one is better?
    Because it has happened two or three times already that I found some sentences using "pulling in to" with the same meaning of "pulling into". That's why I got confused in the first place.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I actually agree with you, Dojibear, and realized it after I made my post. "Pull in" doesn't mean inside something, so the verb does change.
     

    I'm about to learn

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    So you are saying that "pull in to" means just "to get close to something without really going to that place" while "pull into" means "to go inside a place".
    Did I understand right?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, you did. Keep in mind that when it's spoken there's hardly a noticeable difference.
     
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