1. Alondrin Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    Spanish (Spain)
    Hola:

    ¿Alguien sabe si 'barn door' se usa en referencia a la cremallera de un pantalón o es algún tipo de bragueta?

    Si en la Wiki en inglés buscas 'barn door's open' te redirige a fly (clothing), pero no sé por qué.

    Estoy traduciendo un texto sobre cañones y en un momento el autor hace una referencia (no sé si graciosa) diciendo que a esa nueva versión más grande y avanzada se la conocía como 'barn door'. Estoy intentando entender qué ha querido decir y me pregunto si estará relacionado. :( Muchas gracias.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 28, 2015
  2. Rainrover

    Rainrover Member

    English - US
    A primera vista, creo que el autor se refiere al tamaño de la brecha que el cañón nuevo hará, que una "barn door" es una puerta de gran tamaño.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 28, 2015
  3. bookandlanguagelover Senior Member

    English - U.S.A.
    Hola Alondrin,

    We don't call the zipper a barn door, but if the zipper is down/if the pants are unzipped, we will use the expression "barn door's open" to gently (or comically) tell someone to check their pants. As an isolated item, no, we would never say "My dress has an invisible barn door." No way. We would say "My dress has an invisible zipper" and that's it. Come to think of it, we only use that term when the zipper is located at the crotch. An open zipper on the back of a dress or skirt would just be referred to as "down."

    In terms of the canon, I'm really not sure. Hopefully another awesome forero can help you out with that!

    Cheers! :)
     
  4. Alondrin Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    Spanish (Spain)
    Thank you very much.

    I was just very confused by the fact that the wiki would redirect me to the Fly article and I guess my mind is a bit dirty, I was searching for metaphors about cannons and... just jumped to conclusions.

    After making a pause and re-reading the text I think I understand it better. I don't copy it here because it's... convoluted, but now I think that the author was rather talking about the gun shield, that after the improvements was large and flat, and therefore the 'barn door' comment.

    Thank you again. I guess that saying 'barn door's open' is similar to when someone asks here '¿eres poeta?, though it's rather childish.
     
  5. Alondrin Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    Spanish (Spain)
    Sorry I didn't finish my explanation.

    The question '¿eres poeta?' would come as a surprise to the one with the zipper down, and would probable ask "what?' or 'why?' and then you'd answer 'pues abrochate la bragueta'.

    Like I said. Very childish. But usually the second part of the conversation never happens.
     
  6. bookandlanguagelover Senior Member

    English - U.S.A.
    Yes, all of that makes perfect sense.

    By the way,

    After making a pause --> "After taking a pause"/ "After pausing"
    or even better "After taking a break"

    I don't copy it here --> "I'm not copying it here"

    And yes, it is rather childish, although some people -even adults - prefer the euphemism to preserve a little modesty and save some embarassment in the more awkward of those situations. This could probably be another thread but "XYZ" is even more common and stands for "eXamine Your Zipper." ;)

    Cheers! :)
     
  7. Alondrin Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    Spanish (Spain)
    Great :)

    Thank you for your corrections. And I'll try to remember the 'XYZ', I love this kind of things :)
     
  8. dalequetepega Senior Member

    New Orleans, Louisiana
    USA, English
    Estoy de acuerdo con todo lo dicho, solo quise añadir que este uso de "barn door" para referirse a la bragueta es bastante reciente. Me imagino que un texto sobre cañones antecede por siglos a esa acepción.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 28, 2015
  9. bookandlanguagelover Senior Member

    English - U.S.A.
    De nada. Una más..., jejeje... I love this kind of things --> that kind of thing / those kinds of things. ¡Un saludo! :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 28, 2015
  10. lapsus linguae Member

    Canary Islands - Canarias
    Spanish (Spain)
  11. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    Not that I know of, but it wouldn't surprise me to learn that truckers call them barn doors, as it would be a comically apt name.

    As for the original question, we never saw the English sentence in which the term appeared, which makes it very difficult to comment.
     

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