bars are pure Tchaikovsky

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Mack&Mack

Senior Member
Korea & Korean
Dear helpers,

is it right to say "The next few bars are pure Tchaikovsky."?

I heard that "The next few bars is pure Tchaikovsky." is also right.

I'm confused with the singluar and plural from. And could you let me know What the sentences exactly mean?

Thanks..
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Mack&Mack said:
    Dear helpers,

    is it right to say "The next few bars are pure Tchaikovsky."?

    I was heard that "The next few bars is pure Tchaikovsky." is also right.

    I'm confused with the singluar and plural from. And could you let me know What the sentences exactly mean?

    Thanks..
    Definitely "bars are."

    But I don't really get what the sentence means. Maybe someone else can help you with that.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    If it's the "bars" part that's got you confused, they are musical bars-- i.e. segments in the time signature of the music as written. Eight bars is so many beats, so much time-- eight oom-chuck-chucks if it's a waltz, and that rhymes with schmaltz and that's where the purity comes in (in case that's the part that's confusing you).

    We're listening to Tchaikowsky, the next bars coming up are going to wax lyrical-- it will really typify him, as certain passages of any composer are more redolent of his style than others. The strings have introduced the theme, it's been inverted and played backwards and contrapuntally, and now after a clever but rather lockstep modulation-- no wait, that's Beethoven.

    Okay, Tchaikowsky-- it gets passed along, like an ungulate quadruped's rumen, to the brass section. Now they're going to go to town with it, as the kettledrums swell and the ladies in the audience begin to swoon...

    Now that's pure Tchaikowsky, I'm telling you you could fry donuts in that stuff. Peter and the Wolf is that other guy.
    .
     

    Gordonedi

    Senior Member
    UK (Scotland) English
    I agree that are is correct and should be used.

    But if you were actually listening to the music and commenting upon it, you would say "Now that is pure Tchaikovsky."

    It is not far from that to "The next section is pure Tchaikovsky", and from there to "The next few bars is pure Tchaikovsky."

    What you are really saying is that "(The style of) the next few bars is pure Tchaikovsky." so there is an implied singular subject to the verb.

    My advice is to stick to the plural form. It's debate-proof. :)
     

    bartonig

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Mack&Mack said:
    Dear helpers,

    is it right to say "The next few bars are pure Tchaikovsky."?

    I heard that "The next few bars is pure Tchaikovsky." is also right.

    I'm confused with the singluar and plural from. And could you let me know What the sentences exactly mean?

    Thanks..
    In British Standard English The next few bars are pure Tchaikovsky is correct. The word bars is plural and, furthermore, the word few is a quantifier and is only used with plural nouns.
     

    Mack&Mack

    Senior Member
    Korea & Korean
    Thanks a lot all of you!

    I really appreciate your help.

    - A frustrated English Teacher wanna-be -
     
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