(baseball?)record-breaking home run ball

< Previous | Next >

athena3rm

Senior Member
Italiano, Italy
The now celebrated dispute between Popov and Hayashi over the captue of Barry Bond’s record-breaking home run ball counts as one such case, but only because the San Francisco Giants did not stipulate the rule that governed its capture.

Can anyone help me explaining what does it mean?
Thank you all!
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hi Athena,

    Barry Bonds is a baseball player who has hit more home runs than anyone except Babe Ruth and Hank Aaron. One of his hits broke a previous record. Probably two fans, named Hayashi and Popov, caught or fought over the ball he hit on that occasion. Because the team Bonds plays for--The Giants--are also the legal tenant of the stadium where the ball was hit, they might have prevented such disputes by establishing some rule. Because they did not, a dispute followed the hit, and attempts by two spectators to grab the ball afterwards.

    It seems that the ball, Bonds's homerun #73, left the stadium, and the dispute is about who had control of it in the spectator stands:

    On Oct. 7, 2001, Bonds hit a ball over the right field fence at Pacific Bell Park in a standing room only section. The ball landed in Popov’s mitt before fans in his vicinity knocked him to the ground and fell on top of him. When he arose from the pile, Popov discovered a ball labeled "sucker" in ink pen in his glove—one of the many balls of the kind dispersed by fans that day. The genuine home run ball had been recovered by Hayashi.
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    The verb counts goes with the subject dispute. That's easier to see if you pull out the intervening prepositional phrases: The now celebrated dispute between Popov and Hayashi... counts as one such case. It is saying that this particular dispute is an example of or falls into the category of a certain type of case, that I assume was defined in a previous sentence ("such cases").

    The dispute between Popov and Hayashi is about the "capture" of the baseball that Barry Bonds hit to break the home run record. I think this ultimately means that there is disagreement about who owns this particular baseball.

    Elizabeth
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    Athena, in baseball, they use the word "field" or "field of play." So, yes, a homerun is a baseball that the batter hits beyond the field of play, but in fair territory (typically over the outfield fence or wall). In such a case, the batter automatically is entitled to circle the bases and score a run, and any runners that were on the bases at the time the homerun was hit will also score a run.

    If you need more explanation, feel free to send me a PM. :)

    Elizabeth
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top