based on / on the basis of

IMBpeter

Member
Chinese
Choose “based on” and “on the basis of ” depending on your meaning. Phrases starting with “based on” must modify a noun or pronoun that usually immediately precedes or follows the phrase. Use phrases starting with “on the basis of ” to modify a verb.
The doctors’ new methods in brain surgery were based on Ben Carson’s work.
On the basis of the molecular orbital calculations, we propose a mechanism that can account for all the major features of alkali and alkaline earth catalyzed gasification
reactions. (not Based on …)

The above three paragraphs explain how to use “based on” and “on the basis of”. Even though there are two examples, I still can’t understand it. Could anyone help me with it?
Thanks.

Source: Book (The ACS Style Guide Effective Communication of Scientific Information).
 
  • t_desales

    New Member
    English - United Kingdom
    Phrases starting with “based on” must modify a noun or pronoun that usually immediately precedes or follows the phrase.

    "The doctors’ new methods in brain surgery were based on Ben Carson’s work."

    Here, the "based on" modifierrefers to Ben Carson's work
    the noun being modified is methods in brain surgery
    The noun immediately precedes the modifier based on

    Another example I just made up:

    Based on IMF projections, GDP is set to rise by 2%.

    Here, the based on modifier of the sentence is the IMF projections.
    the noun being modified by the 'based on' is GDP
    That noun immediately follows the modifier based on.

    This is a very simple rule in practice, but explaining it make it seem a little more complicated.
     

    tetulio5

    Senior Member
    Spanish-España
    Hello,

    A man is looking carefully at the latest addition of a modern art object, and he says (thinking about owner's art taste):

    ' On the bases of this, it is quite obvious that he doesn't have taste'
    ' Basándome en esto/en base a esto, es bastante obvio que no tiene gusto.'

    Please, could you correct my mistakes? Thank you so much
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    "The doctors’ new methods in brain surgery were based on Ben Carson’s work."

    Here, the "based on" modifierrefers to Ben Carson's work
    the noun being modified is methods in brain surgery
    The noun immediately precedes the modifier based on

    Another example I just made up:

    Based on IMF projections, GDP is set to rise by 2%.

    Here, the based on modifier of the sentence is the IMF projections.
    the noun being modified by the 'based on' is GDP
    That noun immediately follows the modifier based on.

    This is a very simple rule in practice, but explaining it make it seem a little more complicated.
    What do you exactly mean t_desales?
    Do you mean that "on the basis of" only modifies a noun (frase), while "on the basis of" only modifies a verb?
    If so, these two phrases cannot be substituted in the following sentences:

    - The *movie* was "based on" a true story.
    - They *made* this movie "on the basis of" a real life.

    Do you confirm?

    I would appreciate it if you could clarify your intention with a couple of sinple examples.
     
    Last edited:

    RYW

    New Member
    American English

    "The doctors’ new methods in brain surgery were based on Ben Carson’s work."

    Here, the "based on" modifierrefers to Ben Carson's work
    the noun being modified is methods in brain surgery
    The noun immediately precedes the modifier based on

    Another example I just made up:

    Based on IMF projections, GDP is set to rise by 2%.

    Here, the based on modifier of the sentence is the IMF projections.
    the noun being modified by the 'based on' is GDP
    That noun immediately follows the modifier based on.

    This is a very simple rule in practice, but explaining it make it seem a little more complicated.
    In your example, shouldn't it be "on the basis of"? Isn't it the "is set to rise" that is based on IMF projections, and not the GDP?
     

    RYW

    New Member
    American English
    Hello,

    A man is looking carefully at the latest addition of a modern art object, and he says (thinking about owner's art taste):

    ' On the bases of this, it is quite obvious that he doesn't have taste'
    ' Basándome en esto/en base a esto, es bastante obvio que no tiene gusto.'

    Please, could you correct my mistakes? Thank you so much
    I think it should be "based on this" since it is referring to the modern art object and not to the verb.
     

    RYW

    New Member
    American English
    What do you exactly mean t_desales?
    Do you mean that "on the basis of" only modifies a noun (frase), while "on the basis of" only modifies a verb?
    If so, these two phrases cannot be substituted in the following sentences:

    - The *movie* was "based on" a true story.
    - They *made* this movie "on the basis of" a real life.

    Do you confirm?

    I would appreciate it if you could clarify your intention with a couple of sinple examples.
    In both your examples, it is still the movie that is based on a true story or on real life, and therefore "on the basis of" is incorrect in the second sentence. Examples of correct usage:

    She was accepted to Harvard on the basis of her high grades and warm recommendations. (the phrase modifies the verb "was accepted")
    The coach selected team members on the basis of their skill and performance. (the phrase modifies the verb "selected")

    see more examples here:
    On the basis of in a sentence (esp. good sentence like quote, proverb...).
     
    Top