bastide

  • Nico5992

    Senior Member
    France (French)
    From ATILF:

    BASTIDE, subst. fém.
    A. FORTIF., vx. Petite fortification temporaire; ouvrage de fortification isolé, mais faisant partie d'un ensemble. Forteresse.
    [...]

    B. Région. (Provence)
    1. ''Ferme isolée, parfois fortifiée, qui s'oppose au village`` (GEORGE 1970).

    2. P. ext. Petite maison de plaisance à la campagne, souvent à l'usage des citadins :

    3. « Alors, dit-il, vous vous trouvez bien dans votre bastide, monsieur le Curé? » Cette bastide était une de ces maisons microscopiques où les provençaux des villes et des villages vont se nicher, en été, pour prendre l'air.
    MAUPASSANT, Contes et nouvelles, t. 2, Le Champ d'oliviers, 1890, p. 80.

    4. Le poste à feu est une petite bastide qu'on appelle aussi Micolombe, et qui m'appartient. Elle se tient à quinze cents mètres d'ici, sur un bout de plateau où pousse une pinède.
    BOSCO, Le Mas Théotime, 1945, p. 37.

    [...]
     

    Nywoe

    Senior Member
    Canada: English and French
    bastide = small country house, farm, fortified town, fortification

    It would really depend on the context.

    N.
     

    valerie

    Senior Member
    France, French & Spanish
    In the south west of France, une Bastide is a new village created between XIIth and XIVth centuries, with specific urbanism concepts and functions.

    Examples of Bastides are: Cordes, Gimont, Villefranche de Rouergue, Mirepoix

    [...]
     
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    AnnieF

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Strictly speaking these towns are not 'bastides' but 'villes bastides' - i.e. towns built as forteresses .......

    ... or even fortresses!
     
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    valerie

    Senior Member
    France, French & Spanish
    Actually, the bastides are not fortresses, they were created on the contrary to be market places, to organise periodical fairs. They were thought as new open towns. Of course most of them built fortifications later, when they were allowed to.
     

    AnnieF

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Now that's confused me .... when I've visited towns like Villeréal, all the tourist office documentation describes 'villes bastides' as being built in a layout that enabled the inhabitants to effectively defend them from attack, particularly in the sense that they can gradually retreat to the securest building in the town (usually the church) as their last point of defence. Although most of them have market squares, I wasn't aware that this was generally considered to be the main feature of a 'ville bastide'. Does anyone else have any thoughts on this?
     

    Nico5992

    Senior Member
    France (French)
    AnnieF said:
    Now that's confused me .... when I've visited towns like Villeréal, all the tourist office documentation describes 'villes bastides' as being built in a layout that enabled the inhabitants to effectively defend them from attack, particularly in the sense that they can gradually retreat to the securest building in the town (usually the church) as their last point of defence. Although most of them have market squares, I wasn't aware that this was generally considered to be the main feature of a 'ville bastide'. Does anyone else have any thoughts on this?
    It seems that the word "bastide" takes different meanings depending on where it is used. I believe that Valerie is explaining the South-Western definition of "bastide" while you had in mind the South-Eastern one.
     

    Jaya

    New Member
    India
    "Fort Knox " I see this word(S) used in a lot of places. I know it means a very secure area but does anybody know where the term came from????
     
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