bath/bathe (bathes-bathing-bathed)

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  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    In American English the verb is "bathe" and the noun is "bath". Yes, bathes, bathing and bathed are all forms of the verb.

    None of them have the bright "a" sound of bath, in my accent. All of them rhyme with "lathe" or "scathe".

    I believe that "bath" is both a noun and a verb in British English.

    Here is a recording of "bathing":

    http://www.macmillandictionary.com/us/pronunciation/british/bathing
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Yes, as James says, there is a verb "bath" in BrE, as well as a verb "bathe": see, for example, bath / bathe.

    The forms of "bathe" are bathe, bathes, bathing, bathed.
    The forms of "bath" are
    bath, baths, bathing, bathed.

    (The blue forms do not rhyme with the red forms:).)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    As I understand it, Loob, the verb form of "bath" is equivalent to "give a bath to", is that correct? For example, "I'll call you back later. It's time for me to bath the baby."
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Yes, that's exactly right, James:thumbsup:.

    This evening, I had to bath both my dogs: the weather here's foul at the moment, and they were both filthy:(.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Yes, as James says, there is a verb "bath" in BrE, as well as a verb "bathe": see, for example, bath / bathe.
    This evening, I had to bath both my dogs . . .
    Loob, I'd supposed that your verb bath was our bathe; I hadn't realized you had both. Under what circumstances would you bathe your dogs? (Or is it never transitive?)

    Addendum: I did read the prior thread to which you link. It doesn't seem to answer my question.
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi Parla!:)

    Yes, it's interesting: it's as if there's a space taken up by AmE '[to] bathe', and for BrE-speakers '[to] bath' takes up a bit of that space and '[to] bathe' takes up the remainder. (Does that make sense?:rolleyes:)

    I would use "bathe" transitively, but only in quasi-medical rather than "hygienic" contexts:
    When my eyes are itchy, I bathe them in Parloob eye-wash.
    After she had an ingrowing toenail operation, she had to bathe her foot every other day in salty water.

    The overtones here are "soak"/"rinse" rather than "make clean".

    I found this Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary User Note, which I think works for me:
    When you wash yourself you can say that you bath (British English) or bathe (North American English) , but it is much more common to say have a bath (British English) or take a bath (North American English).
    You can also bath (British English) or bathe (North American English) another person, for example a baby.
    You bathe a part of your body, especially to clean a wound.
    When you go swimming it is old-fashioned to say that you bathe, and you cannot say that you bath or take a bath. It is more common to swim, go for a swim, have a swim or go swimming:Let’s go for a quick swim in the pool. ◇ She goes swimming every morning before breakfast. What you wear for this activity is usually called a swimming costume in British English and a bathing suit in North American English.
    ...
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Thank you, Loob! The difference between your verbs "bath" and "bathe" is now totally clear. :thumbsup::)

    The note from the Oxford learner's dictionary is also quite helpful, although one item's outdated: I can't recall when I last heard "bathing suit"; the item is a swimsuit in AE.
     

    Daniel López

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Yes, as James says, there is a verb "bath" in BrE, as well as a verb "bathe": see, for example, bath / bathe.

    The forms of "bathe" are bathe, bathes, bathing, bathed.
    The forms of "bath" are
    bath, baths, bathing, bathed.

    (The blue forms do not rhyme with the red forms:).)
    Then, how do you pronounce "bathing, bathed" (from "bath)? Not the same as the same verbal forms from "bathe"/beidin/ /beidid/?

    Thank you.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Bathe = bayth (bay rhymes with hay) the th is hard /beɪð/ as in the
    Bath -> rhymes with path the th is soft /bɑːθ/ /bæ θ/ as in thin
     

    vivace160

    Member
    American English
    Thank you, Loob! The difference between your verbs "bath" and "bathe" is now totally clear. :thumbsup::)

    The note from the Oxford learner's dictionary is also quite helpful, although one item's outdated: I can't recall when I last heard "bathing suit"; the item is a swimsuit in AE.
    "Bathing suit" is extremely common where I'm from. I say it and so does everyone else I know, including those younger than I am (33). I've heard "swimsuit" used, but, in my experience, it's not nearly as common as "bathing suit".
     
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