bath / bathe [have/take]

< Previous | Next >

nasridine

Senior Member
USA
Chinese, China
Taking a shower is like standing under the shower spray. What is the word for the other kind of bath that you fill the tub with water and soak yourself in it?
 
  • liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    It's a bath or a bathtub.
    Whether to "take" or "have" a bath/shower is yet another difference between AE and BE. In BE we have a bath or shower, in AE they take a bath or shower (although where they take it to I have no idea).
     

    dobes

    Senior Member
    US English(Boston/NY)
    Well, we take it in the bathtub or shower of course! AND we use 'bathing' for when we are taking a bath, and swimming for when we are swimming in the pool or the sea. Silly us!
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Well, we take it in the bathtub or shower of course! AND we use 'bathing' for when we are taking a bath, and swimming for when we are swimming in the pool or the sea. Silly us!
    My apologies for my poor joke at the expense of AE. I suppose the verb "take" is used here in a similar sense to the way we say "to take medicine" and of course it makes perfect sense. I believe the use of "take" with a bath or shower is becoming more common in BE now too.
    The verb "to bathe" is no longer very common and I certainly wouldn't use it if I was talking about going for a swim. It's an old-fashioned term which I guess dates back to when swimming recreationally was less common and people would enter the sea or a pool without swimming. "To sunbathe" is a more frequent modern form.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would say bath-tub or maybe slipper bath, though in the bath merchants' trade both these seem to designate old-fashioned ornamental baths without flat panels on the side.

    When I was little, the Victorian baths in Bradford used to offer slipper baths (presumably for those who did not have a bathroom at home), as well as use of the swimming pool.
     

    Mossa

    Senior Member
    France French
    Hi everyone,

    In the uk when you go to the bathroom, does the verb "to bath" always refer to "taking an actual bath" or can it more generally mean "get washed" i.e. "take a shower" etc.

    Thanks
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    "I'm going to have/take a bath" = immerse your body in a tub full of water.
    "I'm going to have/take a shower" = stand under the shower head
    "I'm going to go wash up" = wash one's hands and face in the sink

    I don't know about BE, but in AE we don't use the phrase "to bath".
     

    vicky1027

    Senior Member
    usa english
    Dimcl;5065009 said:
    I don't know about BE, but in AE we don't use the phrase "to bath".
    No, we don't "bath", but we do "bathe" :)

    Although that is somewhat old fashioned sounding to me and I would rather "take a shower or take a bath."
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Mossa

    Senior Member
    France French
    No, we don't "bath", but we do "bathe" :)

    Although that is somewhat old fashioned sounding to me and I would rather "take a shower or take a bath"
    ------------------------

    Sorry, my bad. The sentence is actually "I you wanna bath" so i read "want to bathe" instead of "want a bath".
    So in the uk "bath" can only mean "soaking yourself in a tub full of water", not "a shower", right ?
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Having a bath does not necessarily mean a tub full of water, as we discovered in the 40s, when there was an official limit of 3 inches of water in the bath. How they ever thought they could supervise such a restriction is beyond me! However, even a tub-full of water would be somewhat catastrophic, as when one entered the bath and submerged the body, there would, perforce, be an awful lot of water on the floor.
     

    vicky1027

    Senior Member
    usa english
    ------------------------

    Sorry, my bad. The sentence is actually "I you wanna bath" so i read "want to bathe" instead of "want a bath".
    So in the uk "bath" can only mean "soaking yourself in a tub full of water", not "a shower", right ?
    Well, first of all I'm sorry, but I'm AE not BE (and there is a difference) "I you wanna bath" makes no sense at all.

    But, in the US taking a bath (or bathing) is soaking in a tub.
    A shower, as explained is under standing under a nozzle with water flowing down on you.
    To wash up is to wipe yourself down with a wash cloth.

    I hope that's clear!
    Vicky
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    ------------------------

    Sorry, my bad (what does this mean?). The sentence is actually "I you wanna bath" so I read "want to bathe" instead of "want a bath".
    So in the uk U.K., "bath" can only mean "soaking yourself in a tub full of water", not "a shower", right ?
    Does "I you wanna bath" mean "I want to give you a bath"?
     

    Mossa

    Senior Member
    France French
    "Sorry my bad" means "I'm sorry, I made a mistake":D
    Thank you vicky1027 !! Dimcl, I may not be a native speaker but you don't need to lecture me if you don't know what "my bad" means. Anyway... retournons à nos moutons.

    The other sentence made no sense to me either!;)
    Sorry, I made a spelling mistake : it is actually "If you wanna bath" !!!
     

    vicky1027

    Senior Member
    usa english
    Sorry, I made a spelling mistake : it is actually "If you wanna bath" !!!
    Mossa...Mossa...Mossa...

    You are sooo going to get yourself in trouble around here!

    "Do you want a bath"
    or:
    "Do you want to bathe"

    Yes, in AE the 1st is much more common, but even though you pronounce it as "do you wanna bath" which is very common, but only whenspoken. When writing, you definitely say "do you want a bath" or "do you want to take a bath"
     

    Mossa

    Senior Member
    France French
    Mossa...Mossa...Mossa...

    You are sooo going to get yourself in trouble around here!

    Sorry, I thought it was pretty clear (I'm not looking for trouble, quite obviously !!)
    The sentence is off a play written very phonetically (ex: I usta, innit etc.)
    So I guess "If you wanna bath" means "If you want a bath".


    Thank you.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    It's a bath or a bathtub.
    Whether to "take" or "have" a bath/shower is yet another difference between AE and BE. In BE we have a bath or shower, in AE they take a bath or shower (although where they take it to I have no idea).
    One might as easily ask where BE speakers were going to "take" a decision. :)

    It's simply a convention.
     

    TRINTYA

    Member
    English American
    Moderators, I know this was posted before but it was back in 2007 and I am interested current replies and thoughts. Words evolve.

    Bath vs. Bathe

    For me, Bath is a noun but I have heard it many times used as a verb. "I'm going to bath my dog." Hearing it in that way sounds like a verb is missing. I prefer "bathe". Also, are they really interchangeable? I would not say sunbath.
     

    TRINTYA

    Member
    English American
    I would love to know if every one knows that BATH is a noun and BATHE is a verb, why BATH is still used as a verb. Is it taught this way in school. It is not considered slang so I feel it is unacceptable to use BATH as a verb. Am I the only one that is completely irked by this misuse?? I want to hear from the people who feel the word Bath is acceptable as a verb.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I would love to know if every one knows that BATH is a noun and BATHE is a verb, why BATH is still used as a verb. Is it taught this way in school. It is not considered slang so I feel it is unacceptable to use BATH as a verb. Am I the only one that is completely irked by this misuse?? I want to hear from the people who feel the word Bath is acceptable as a verb.
    Hi Trintya - you are still fairly new to the forum, so you will learn that there are (at least) two major forms of English and they often spawn such notions in someone learning this :D
    From the dictionary at WRF (the search box at the top of each page will take you there - it is a form of the Concise Oxford ) has the following entry
    Bath
    verb Brit. wash in a bath.
    The issue is simply a difference in usage between BE and AE (British and American English, respectively, and well, respectfully :D )!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Bath as a verb is normal usage here, but it's perhaps useful to explain that a little more.
    It is normal usage, for example, when talking about what you are going to do with a baby or small child, and it's transitive.
    OED:
    trans. To subject to a bath; to wash or immerse in a bath.

    I bath Edward when I come home from work.
    Where's Mavis? She's bathing the children.


    And note that the first part of "bathing" is pronounced the same as "bath", not "bathe".
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    <<Moderator note: susanna's thread has been added to an existing bath/bathe AmE vs BrE thread >>

    Hi,

    I heard "You can bath the children" on the British TV show Cold Feet. Is this common in BrE? I see the WR dictionary has

    • Brit to wash in a bath
    On the other hand, on dictionary.com, the American dictionary there also has
    verb.
    to wash or soak in a bath.

    and yet I haven't heard any American say that (instead of "bathe the children"). The COCA corpus doesn't have any instances either.

    So is it only a common BrE thing?

    Thank you!
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    To confirm: Americans do not say this. I learned about it on this very forum; before I did, I would have taken it as a simple typographical error.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I think this is normal BrE. To bath is to wash in a bath. To bathe means to paddle in a body of water, or wash a part of the body. In AmE bathe is used for BrE bath. I don't know whether bathe (paddle) is exclusively BrE or whether it's available in AmE too.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, intransitively I'd say I have a bath. I don't bath, though I could say I bathe. (And the AmE for 'have a bath' is 'take a bath'.) I would bath a child or a dog. I would bathe my aching feet. Cleopatra would bathe in asses' milk.
     

    aasheq

    Senior Member
    English (Estuary)
    Yes, in this country you do hear people say "you can bath the children". To me, it sounds like the way nannies used to talk, that is: semi-literate people trying to talk posh. But maybe I am wrong.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top