bath in sunlight golden

< Previous | Next >

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Is "bath in sunlight golden" natural in English in the context? Google Ngram Viewer shows that "sunlight golden" is in use.

****************************

Leisurely I collect chrysanthemum in my garden,
And see the high hills bath in sunlight golden.

Source: My translation from Chinese poem to English.
 
  • Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Is "bath in sunlight golden" natural in English in the context? Google Ngram Viewer shows that "sunlight golden" is in use.

    ****************************

    Leisurely I collect chrysanthemum in my garden,
    And see the high hills bath in sunlight golden.

    Source: My translation from Chinese poem to English.
    This is fine in a poem. Inversion of word order is common in English poetry that has a formal rhyme and meter scheme that the sentenced must accomodate.

    You do not tend to see inversion in contemporary poetry because it does not rely on rhyme and meter.

    I expect if this phrase is turning up on Google, there is a popular 19th century poem that is posted on multiple sites. Or perhaps there is an advertising slogan for "Sunlight Golden Dishwashing Soap."

    You can't trust a search for current usage unless you look at the results.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I Googled and there are numerous times "Sunlight Golden" appear together like Sunlight Golden Retriever Kennel (dogs) and a gold mining company called Sunlight Golden.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    In BE that line would normally be rendered "bathed in sunlight golden" and "bathed" would be the participle from "bathe" not "bath", although there's no way of telling the difference in print.

    I don't see hills as actively going off to bathe in sunlight, I'd expect the sunlight to come to them and for the hills to passively enjoy the experience.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    In BE that line would normally be rendered "bathed in sunlight golden" and "bathed" would be the participle from "bathe" not "bath", although there's no way of telling the difference in print.

    I don't see hills as actively going off to bathe in sunlight, I'd expect the sunlight to come to them and for the hills to passively enjoy the experience.
    Indeed. I clarified my post above and the phrase "bathed in sunlight" is quite familiar (and well represented in the Ngram database).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top