bath in the beach

< Previous | Next >

Pidginboy

Senior Member
India-Local dialect
He has taken in bath in the beach waters.

For that, can I say? "He has taken bath on the beach"
 
  • cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    "On the beach" means on the sand; on the shore. This makes me think that he sat in a bathtub which was on the sand by the sea.

    Do you mean that he washed himself all over while in the water at the beach? I ask because "bathing" at the beach or in the sea often simply means swimming in the sea.

    To avoid that, I would say something like "He has washed himself in the surf" or "He has washed himself in the seawater."
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Does it mean more than that he went for a swim in the sea?

    Pidginboy, remember that to bathe and to bath are different verbs. Your formula would puzzle people.
     
    Last edited:

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Usage in this area varies from place to place, but this is the system I am most familiar with:

    - A bath is this http://www.hg.com.au/images/productPhotos/kohl_pres_bath.jpg (or a more basic alternative), and bathing involves sitting in it with water. Depending where you are from, the a in this bath is pronounced as in sat or as in half, not as in say.

    - When I go to the beach, I sunbathe and swim. The a in sunbathe is pronounced like the vowel in say. When I go to the swimming pool I swim.

    - To me, bathing in the sea or in a river, pronounced with the vowel in say, is EITHER an old-fashioned word for swimming OR a kind of religious ritual.

    - If I were to wash myself in a river, for the purpose of getting rid of physical (rather than spiritual) dirt, I would call it washing or having a wash.
     
    Last edited:

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    One problem is that 'bathing' is the present participle or the gerund of both to bath and to bathe. It can be pronounced in two different ways to indicate which verb is being used.

    To bathe - bathing - beything - what one does when one swims in the sea.
    To bath - bathing - barthing - what one does when one washes oneself in the bathtub.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    bathing in the sea or in a river se16teddy

    The problem is that the present participles of both to bath (the baby) and to bathe (in the sea) are spelt the same way but pronounced differently: baa-thing and bay-dhing respectively. Whether teddy's sentence is correct modern English or not depends on how you pronounce bathing, to indicate which of the twin verbs it comes from.
    bay-dhing is the appropriate pronunciation here.
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    to bath (the baby) and to bathe (in the sea) are spelt the same way but pronounced differently: baa-thing and bay-dhing respectively. …
    "…to bath and to bathe are spelt the same way but pronounced differently", was this a typo? :confused:

    You give a bath to someone (such as a baby), or take/have one yourself.
    "To bath (verb) the children" is quite old fashion and hardly used nowadays.

    To me swimming in the sea is moving in water with a purpose, and bathing inthe sea is similar, but means floating about and taking it easy, splashing about, etc.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    "…to bath and to bathe are spelt the same way but pronounced differently", was this a typo? :confused:" Teafrog

    Of course it's nonsense if you guillotine the beginning of my sentence, which went in entirety:

    The problem is that the present participles of both to bath (the baby) and to bathe (in the sea) are spelt the same way but pronounced differently: baa-thing and bay-dhing respectively.
    i.e. both are spelt bathing, but pronounced differently as I have explained.

    (I cannot believe that it is rather my spelling of spelt and pronounced that you question).
    Be that as it may, Salut, mon pote, A. ;)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "…to bath and to bathe are spelt the same way but pronounced differently", was this a typo? :confused:" Teafrog

    Of course it's nonsense if you guillotine the beginning of my sentence, which went in entirety:

    The problem is that the present participles of both to bath (the baby) and to bathe (in the sea) are spelt the same way but pronounced differently: baa-thing and bay-dhing respectively.
    i.e. both are spelt bathing, but pronounced differently as I have explained.

    (I cannot believe that it is rather my spelling of spelt and pronounced that you question).
    Be that as it may, Salut, mon pote, A. ;)
    It's a bit daft too, because I'd made exactly the same point in the previous post.
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    …I cannot believe that it is rather my spelling of spelt and pronounced that you question.…
    Sorry Arrius, keep your shirt on ;), I simply read your post too quickly and missed the "present participles" :eek: :eek:.
    I admit that was very remiss of me not to pay more attention!
    Mea culpa! A+
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    My dear arboreal amphibian, all's well that finishes well, as you "rusty French"-speakers say. The large print was for clarity and emphasis, not out of pique.:)
    As for TT's remark, I interrupted the drafting of my post to do something urgent and when I posted it belatedly (12 minutes after his), did not notice his very similar post, until a few minutes ago. That despite, or possibly because of, the cryptic remark he addressed to me (which I still do not understand) about throwing out the baby with the bath water. It was not a case of plagiarism, just great minds thinking alike. To TT my regrets. :eek:
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm sorry, Arrius, I didn't mean to be cryptic. Your post talked both about a baby and bathwater and I could resist the obvious and feeble jeu d'esprit. I was pleased that our posts made the same point and then amused that it should have been mildly misunderstood.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top