bathing water / bath water

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agostonbejo

New Member
Hungarian
<< Topic: bathing water / bath water? >>

Which is correct?
AE/BE difference?

Thank you!
 
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  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    We could find it easier to answer your question if you provided a complete sentence and some context. Both phrases are possible in BE, but they mean different things.
     

    agostonbejo

    New Member
    Hungarian
    OK, context: "My son likes to play with his toys in his bath water." (During his evening bath, in the bathtub)
    (It's off the top of my head, I've been just wondering how you correctly say that.)
    - Is "bathing water" actually incorrect in this sense then?
    - What exactly *does* "bathing water" mean?

    Thanks!
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I guess that "bathing water" would be some sort of special water particularly for bathing. Since there is no such thing (as far as I know), it really doesn't matter.
    We call water that is in the bathtub (or that has been used in the bathtub) "bath water."
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    A bath is the thing in your house, and also the process of using it: you have a bath (BrE) / take a bath (AmE). Bathing is done in the sea or in a river, and is usually for pleasure, not for getting clean. I'm not sure what 'bathing water' would be, if there was such a thing - seawater that is unpolluted, so was good for bathing in? But we don't normally say it.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm not sure what 'bathing water' would be, if there was such a thing - seawater that is unpolluted, so was good for bathing in? But we don't normally say it.
    The reason I asked for context is that the term "bathing water" is commonly used in BE. It is of considerable significance in this part of the UK where tourism is important, and water charges are higher than in the rest of the country in order to meet the provisions of the Bathing Water Directive. You might not normally say it in the south-east (not famed for its beaches), but it often features in the newspapers and news reports in this neck of the woods.
     

    vivace160

    Member
    American English
    A bath is the thing in your house, and also the process of using it: you have a bath (BrE) / take a bath (AmE). Bathing is done in the sea or in a river, and is usually for pleasure, not for getting clean. I'm not sure what 'bathing water' would be, if there was such a thing - seawater that is unpolluted, so was good for bathing in? But we don't normally say it.
    For me, bathing is getting clean. Despite the fact I use the term bathing suit instead of swimsuit, I'd never say I was bathing in an ocean or a lake, only that I was swimming in it. I definitely prefer to say "I need to take a bath." instead of "I need to bathe.", but only because the first one is more natural and the second sounds so formal. Otherwise, both sentences mean the same thing to me.

    That said, I wouldn't call water in a bathtub "bathing water", I'd call it "bath water". The only time I can think of when I'd use "bathing water" is to distinguish it from drinking water. If a hurricane was coming and I decided to fill a bunch of containers with water just in case we lost it during the storm, I might tell my family that the water stored in the kitchen is drinking water and the water stored in the bathroom is bathing water.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Without a pronunciation guide, I see this thread as somewhat surreal:

    There is bath (n. and v.) /bæθ, bɑθ/ which give /bæθɪŋ, bɑθɪŋ/ and is spelled bathing

    and bathe (v.) /beɪð/ which gives /beɪðɪŋ/ and is spelled bathing.

    I am happy with /beɪðɪŋ/ water but not /bæθɪŋ, bɑθɪŋ/ water.
     

    vivace160

    Member
    American English
    Without a pronunciation guide, I see this thread as somewhat surreal:

    There is bath (n. and v.) /bæθ, bɑθ/ which give /bæθɪŋ, bɑθɪŋ/ and is spelled bathing

    and bathe (v.) /beɪð/ which gives /beɪðɪŋ/ and is spelled bathing.

    I am happy with /beɪðɪŋ/ water but not /bæθɪŋ, bɑθɪŋ/ water.
    I've honestly never even heard of "bath" being a verb, so I wasn't aware of /bæθɪŋ, bɑθɪŋ/. To clarify my previous post, I wear a /beɪðɪŋ/ suit and the water in my example that isn't drinking water is /beɪðɪŋ/ water. I /beɪð/ in a tub of /bæθ/ water, and I would never say I was /bæθɪŋ/ or /beɪðɪŋ/ in a lake, river, or ocean, I would only say I was swimming (unless I actually took all my clothes off and got into the lake with a bar of soap with the intention of washing myself instead of swimming, then I would say I was /beɪðɪŋ/).
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I should explain that your reply seems to suggest that I was commenting on your post: I was commenting on the whole thread.

    A: "What are you doing in the bathroom?"
    B: "I'm bathing /bæθɪŋ/ the dog/our child/some orphan I found in the street/etc."
    I would never say I was /bæθɪŋ/ or /beɪðɪŋ/ in a lake, river, or ocean,
    I have bathed /bæθ'd/ (I took soap) and bathed /beɪðd/ in a lake (I swam).
     

    vivace160

    Member
    American English
    I should explain that your reply seems to suggest that I was commenting on your post: I was commenting on the whole thread.

    A: "What are you doing in the bathroom?"
    B: "I'm bathing /bæθɪŋ/ the dog/our child/some orphan I found in the street/etc."I have bathed /bæθ'd/ (I took soap) and bathed /beɪðd/ in a lake (I swam).
    Oh no, I figured you were replying about the whole thread, but I didn't know about "bath" being a verb and I realized I probably should clarify myself so no one would think that I meant /bæθɪŋ/ when I wrote "bathing". Either "bath" as a verb isn't used in AmE, or it isn't used in my region of the US because I've never heard it used before so I never knew it was even an option. I would never say "I have /bæθ'd/ in a lake." If I took soap and washed myself in the lake, I would say I /beɪðd/ in the lake. If I didn't wash myself, I wouldn't say I /beɪðd/, I would say I swam, so, for me, /beɪðɪŋ/ water is always water for getting washed.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    A bath is the thing in your house, and also the process of using it: you have a bath (BrE) / take a bath (AmE). Bathing is done in the sea or in a river, and is usually for pleasure, not for getting clean. I'm not sure what 'bathing water' would be, if there was such a thing - seawater that is unpolluted, so was good for bathing in? But we don't normally say it.
    In the USA we use the term bathing for both washing ourselves in the tub, or for recreating in the sea, although not too often.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    There's an old English joke:

    Two children at the seaside.

    A: "You've got dirty feet."
    B: "Yes, we didn't come last year."

    (I said it was old, not funny...)
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    It is of considerable significance in this part of the UK where tourism is important, and water charges are higher than in the rest of the country in order to meet the provisions of the Bathing Water Directive.
    Priceless.

    Bathing waters glossary
    Bathing water
    Parts of the sea or inland waters in the UK that have been designated for people to swim in. Designation in England is made by the Department of Environment Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), in Wales the Welsh Government, in Scotland the Scottish Government and in Northern Ireland the Northern Ireland Executive. These waters are sampled by the relevant environment agency and results of analyses are reported annually to Europe.

    Reminiscent of: 'All water in this hotel has been passed by the management'.
     
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