bathroom

Musical Chairs

Senior Member
Japan & US, Japanese & English
When you're asking where the bathroom is (where you take care of business, not to shower) in British English, what do you call the bathroom? A restroom/washroom/toilets? I think I recall a British person using "toilets" but I don't remember for sure.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    When you're asking where the bathroom is (where you take care of business, not to shower) in British English, what do you call the bathroom? A restroom/washroom/toilets? I think I recall a British person using "toilets" but I don't remember for sure.
    There's been a number of threads in the forum on this subject, Musical Chairs. Here's one:

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=238270&highlight=bathroom+washroom+restroom+toilet

    Just search the forum for washroom+bathroom+restroom+toilet for more.

    Here's another:

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=281243&highlight=restroom+toilet+washroom
     

    bouton-d'or

    New Member
    U.S. - English
    Musical Chairs:
    The other threads on this will be helpful if you want a more in-depth look at why or why not you can use words like "toilet" and "restroom" in one country but not the other, but my short reply is, after having spent six months studying at Oxford, the most commonly used term I remember hearing is "toilet." It might seem a bit awkward to you to use the word "toilet" for "bathroom" at first, but believe me, it works. If you ask for a "bathroom" or "restroom" nobody will know what you're talking about... or at least, they will pretend to not know what you're talking about!
     

    Ecossaise

    Senior Member
    English
    If you are in a public place (restaurant, theatre etc), you can ask "Where is the Ladies?" or "Where is the Gents?".

    In someone's home, I would say "bathroom" or "loo" - both would be fine.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Musical Chairs:
    The other threads on this will be helpful if you want a more in-depth look at why or why not you can use words like "toilet" and "restroom" in one country but not the other, but my short reply is, after having spent six months studying at Oxford, the most commonly used term I remember hearing is "toilet." It might seem a bit awkward to you to use the word "toilet" for "bathroom" at first, but believe me, it works. If you ask for a "bathroom" or "restroom" nobody will know what you're talking about... or at least, they will pretend to not know what you're talking about!
    Sorry for off-topic, but I think it should be pretend not to.....:eek:
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    I think you would be understood if you ask where the bathroom is in someone's home, but toilet is better because it might be separate to the bathroom. We sometimes use the plural for public facilities; "Where are the toilets?", bathroom wouldn't make much sense in this context. Restroom and washroom are AE expressions. You can ask for directions to the lavatory if you want to be more formal.
     

    difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    Many BE-speakers find the notion of refering to a place in which a toilet is kept as a bathroom to be peculiar...unless of course the room contains a bath as well.
    One does not take a bath, nor a rest in a toilet.
     
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