battery (Batterie / Akku)

elroy

Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
German uses "Batterie" for non-rechargeable batteries and "Akku" for rechargeable batteries. Does any other language use different terms for these? I don't know of any. My guess is that in most languages it works as in English: one noun and different qualifiers to distinguish.
 
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  • Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    French does, if this is what you call non-rechargeable batteries:
    pile-alcaline-1024x629.jpg

    We call them pile(s) /pil/.


    For rechargeable batteries, we call them batterie(s) /ba.tʁi/:
    batterie-yuasa-12v-60ah-ybx3075.jpg


    51tpxbvIGIL._AC_SL1000_.jpg
     
    Greek uses «μπαταρία» [(ɱ)ba.t̠a.ˈɾi.a] (fem.) for all types of batteries < Fr. batterie. For the rechargeable one the verbal adjective «επαναφορτιζόμενη» [e̞.pa.na.fo̞r.t̠i.ˈz̠o̞.me̞.ni] (fem.) preceds the noun, a compound: MoGr prefix & preposition «επί» [e̞.ˈpi] --> on, upon, (math.) times < Classical prefix & preposition «ἐπί» ĕpí + MoGr preposition «ανά» [a.ˈna] --> per, by, through, throughout < Classical preposition «ἀνά» ănắ + MoGr verb «φορτίζω» [fo̞r.ˈt̠i.z̠o̞] --> to charge up, electrify < Classical ο-grade verb «φορτίζω» pʰŏrtízō --> to load up < Classical v. «φέρω» pʰérō.

    Some decades ago, for the long rectangular/round ones
    batteries.jpeg

    (the buttonlike ones excluded) we used «στήλη» [ˈs̠t̠ili] (fem. sing.), «στήλες» [ˈs̠t̠ile̞s̠] (fem. pl.) < Classical feminine noun «στήλη» stḗlē. The name has fallen out of usage nowadays.

    Katharevousa Greek introduced in 1888 the name «συσσωρευτής» [s̠i.s̠o̞.ɾe̞.ˈft̠is̠] (masc.) for battery a calque for the Fr. accumulateur. It's a compound: MoGr prefix & preposition «συν» [s̠in] (which is assimilated to «συσ-» [s̠is̠-] when the next word begins with a sigma) --> plus < Classical prefix & preposition «σύν» sún + MoGr v. «σωρεύω» [s̠o̞.ˈɾe̞.vo̞] --> to heap up, pile up < Classical verb «σωρεύω» sōreúō (idem), a denominative from the Classical masc. noun «σωρός» sōrós --> heap (of grain) (could be IE but there are no known cognates outside Greek).
    The name «συσσωρευτής» is used rarely nowadays in formal occasions (scientific dissertations) or as technical jargon, it didn't catch on in the vernacular.
     
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    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    These ones (piles rechargeables) are also called "Akkus" in German.
    1664696455394.png
    Yes indeed, in French we call these pile(s) rechargeable(s).

    But French batterie(s) is by definition supposed to be rechargeable.

    We also have the word accumulateur(s), sometimes abbreviated into accu(s) /aky/, but it's a more general term, like the English accumulator.
     
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    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Deutsch

    akku (1.2V).jpg

    (German) Akku, 1.2 V, written at the battery is in English: rechargeable battery = German: wiederaufladbare Batterie
    Note that the print at the Akkus says "battery" in English.

    Batterie (1.5V).jpg


    Batterie, 1,5 V (not rechargeable)
    Note that it has 1.5 V
    ---
    This is a difference that might be important.

    ---

    Partly overlapped with Demiurg

    PS: "Akku" is short for "Akkumulator" but in daily language it is shortened to "Akku".
    ("Wiederaufladbare Batterie" is much too long, too, in my mind)


    ---
    If it is not important that they are rechargeable, sometimes we call the "Akku" "Batterie", too, as umbrella term (Oberbegriff).
     
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    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    It changed the meaning a lot. Sometimes a "Batterie" became a set of canons in German. This was used as metaphor for a set of connected electrical cells. Later it was used for single cells, too.
    Compare to English: "battle".
    (overlapped with Frank)
     
    Of course. A battery (electricity) is a set of cells, just like a battery (military) is a set of guns.
    It's still used isn't it? Artillery Battery (Eng.), Artilleriebatterie (Ger.), Batterie (Fr.).
    To us, «μπαταρία» is only the electric one.

    The military unit is «πυροβολαρχία» [pi.ɾo̞.vo̞.lar.ˈçi.a] (fem.) a 1833 construction, a compound: «πυροβόλον»* [pi.ɾo̞.ˈvo̞.lo̞n] (neut.) --> artillery cannon, (modern) howitzer + MoGr verb «άρχω» [ˈar.xo̞] --> to rule, be in command, start/begin from/with something < Classical v. «ἄρχω» ắrkʰō.

    *A compound: Katharevousa & Classical Gr neuter noun «πῦρ» (Classical pronunciation: [pyːr], MoGr pronunciation: [piɾ]) --> fire + Katharevousa & Classical masc. o-grade noun «βόλος» (Classical pron: [ˈbo.los], MoGr pron.: [ˈvo̞.lo̞s̠]) --> throwing < Classical v. «βάλλω» bắllō --> to throw, cast, hurl.
     
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    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    German uses "Batterie" for non-rechargeable batteries and "Akku" for rechargeable batteries. Does any other language use different terms for these?
    Russian basically does, even though that distinction isn't very consistent.
    1. Батарейка (bataréyka, lit. "little battery"): basically a small non-rechargeable battery; I suppose, colloquially it may be used regarding any battery of the shape typical to small non-rechargeable batteries.
    2. Аккумулятор (akkumulyátor): any rechargeable battery, from a car battery to an AAA rechargeable battery.
    3. Батарея (bataréya): a larger battery, rechargeable or not (cf. the expression аккумуляторная батарея "accumulator battery" = аккумулятор).
     

    alfaalfa

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Ciao,
    These ones (piles rechargeables)
    1664797232816.png

    in Italian: batterie ricaricabili.



    Non rechargeable batteries are equally pile or batterie (I wouldn't say pile is dated but, maybe, the elders use more pile than batterie)

    From left to right
    pila piatta (flat)
    torcia (torch)
    mezza torcia (half torch)
    stilo (style)
    ministilo
    no name
    no name
    transistor
    bottone
    (button)
    fiammifero (match)
    righello (ruler)
    (ok... maybe the last two are OP :D )

    Batteria
    In French yes, for example "une batterie de canons":

    1280px-Karlskrona_Stumholmen_BastionKungshall_Kanoner.jpg

    Batterie (armament) — Wikipédia
    Batteria
     
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    Abaye

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Hebrew:
    We use the foreign בטריה "bateria" (colloquially also "bataria") for any electric battery, chargeable or not, tiny or large.
    We use the biblical סוללה "solela" for all meanings specified above: electric, military, etc.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Die Voltasche Säule (Pila di Volta) war eine Batterie, nach beiden Definitionen: mehr als ein Element, nicht wieder aufladbar.

    The Voltaic pile (Pila di Volta) was a battery, according to both definitions, more than one element, not rechargeable.
    Voltaic pile - Wikipedia

    Today the name "battery" is often used for just one element.

    Unfortunately ;) in many languages "pile" was replaced by a derivation of "battery".
     
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    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Unfortunately ;) in many languages "pile" was replaced by a derivation of "battery".
    In Russian Voltaic pile is known as вольтов столб (vо́l'tov stolb), i.e. "Volta's pole/pillar". However, more developed galvanic sources of electricity later became known as "elements", "batteries" (< "batteries of elements") and "accumulators" (< "accumulator batteries") as well. The second and the third term became particularly widely used.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Yup, I got that one too. They were included in my reference to "getting it."
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    I don't really think that anybody gives a hoot or even knows, what each of the mentioned energy sources should be called.
    Originally I learned that battery/Batterie/batteri only applies when it is several cells in a series - like the 4.5 V thing in

    apmoy70 's post​


    Today I only hear everyone call everything a battery or the equivalent in other languages ...
    In Danish I do hear "akkumulator" for the larger ones with acid/distilled water in them, but still "batteri" for the smaller rechargable or one-way ones.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    I don't really think that anybody gives a hoot or even knows, what each of the mentioned energy sources should be called.
    Originally I learned that battery/Batterie/batteri only applies when it is several cells in a series - like the 4.5 V thing in

    apmoy70 's post​


    Today I only hear everyone call everything a battery or the equivalent in other languages ...
    In Danish I do hear "akkumulator" for the larger ones with acid/distilled water in them, but still "batteri" for the smaller rechargable or one-way ones.
    Unfortunately the result is that many things do not work as wished. It might even be dangerous.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    Unfortunately the result is that many things do not work as wished. It might even be dangerous.

    !!!r
    Probably the words "wiederaufladbar", "rechargable" or "genopladelig" are the most important words to recognize - or especially the absence of these, or else it could really become unpleasant.

    ...

    I also always found it quite funny that one can be taken to court and charged with battery.
    However, even if it is not your first offense of the kind you are not being re-charged.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    My wife has problems with reading the descriptions on batteries. They make the letter size as small as possible. It is not possible to read them even with glasses except you have eagle eyes.
    They write many information with the only purpose not to be charged at a court - this is my impression.
    The most important thing - the voltage - is printed very small, too.
    By the way: Almost all text is in English. So my wife thought it was a battery - but it was an akku.
    I cannot read the description without special lenses. I can recognize the voltage at AA size - so I see: Akku 1.2 V, battery - 1.5 V. But they are writing a false friend: "battery".
    Note: Some "Akkus" ("Rechargeable batteries) have 1.5 V. But the need special devices to charge them.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Almost all text is in English. So my wife thought it was a battery - but it was an akku.
    In France, the law makes it mandatory that all products sold in France have instructions (or composition, for food products) in French.

    Products of foreign origin often have an additional sticker in French, that translates instructions or composition in foreign language.
     
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    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    In France, the law makes it mandatory that all products sold in France have instructions (or composition, for food products) in French.

    Products of foreign origin often have an additional sticker in French, that translates instructions or composition in foreign language.

    Probably does not help much if the translation is the same quality descriptions for small electronic or electric devices from asia normally are - or if it is a retranslation of such a translation into English.
    Such a law would be nice if there were also some quality requirements attached to it.
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Romanian:
    baterie (pl baterii) = every type of electric battery ever
    acumulator = what IKEA obstinately calls its rechargeable batteries. Well, other people, too. Often just referred to as "baterie reîncărcabilă"

    --
    We do take the "cluster/system/ensemble" meaning seriously, though. The word also means, depending on context,
    • that whole faucet system thing shown in posts above
    • group of cannons/artillery unit
    • sets of small, stackable cages for "raising" chickens
    • drum kit
    • the ensemble of percussion instruments in an orchestra
    • an ice bucket together with the drinks it contains (now obsolete, but in old plays you might find a customer asking the waiter for a battery, which would mean a bottle of wine + sparkling water)
    And of course battery of tests and so on, but these mostly require a modifier of some sort.
     
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    HilfswilligerGenosse

    Senior Member
    German, High German
    sets of small, stackable cages for "raising" chickens
    This can be called a Legebatterie ("(egg-)laying battery") and the most likely cruel form of factory farming chicken is called Batteriehaltung ("battery farming/keeping") in German. The latter term (Batteriehaltung) is quite derogatory nowadays, officially it's some euphemism.
     
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